In-Browser Windows 1.0 and Windows 95 Simulators

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#1
I came across these two links, they're pretty cool. They run old versions of Windows in your browser via a javascript-based virtual machine.

I haven't been able to get the Windows 95 one to run, but the Windows 1.0 seems to be the real deal. I don't think they re-implemented a copy of Windows, I think that's the actual Windows 1.0 binary running in the browser.

http://www.pcjs.org/devices/pc/machine/5160/cga/256kb/win101/
http://win95.ajf.me/win95.html

Can anyone get the second one to run?
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#2
Scratch that. It only took forever, but it loaded!

Screen Shot 2015-05-11 at 11.02.17 AM.png
 

Ex_Brit

If you're going through hell, keep going.
Staff member
#3
Fascinating......those were slightly before my time, home PC-wise. My first was XP.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#4
The upgrade from Windows 3.11 to Windows 95 was my first real adventure with OS installs. 31 disks, and lo and behold, on the 30th of them: a read error!
I had found the disks in my dad's desk, and I think he had bought them a few months prior - didn't know what to do with my freshly-formatted brick that errored out at disk 30 of 31 - especially because I didn't have permission to be doing anything of the sort, sprawled out as I was on my stomach on the basement floor, hunched over the computer and excited to be upgrading to this new system with a menu and that (retrospectively very nasty) greenish-blue background. Not knowing any better, I just sat there taking the floppy out, shaking it, putting it back in, waiting 5 - 10 minutes for the copy to fail, then doing it all over again. Somehow, I got lucky and it was able to finally read the bad file/sector and was relieved to be booting into Windows 95 an hour later.

I'll never forget.
 

Ex_Brit

If you're going through hell, keep going.
Staff member
#5
LOL, I never even encountered as much as a pocket calculator until my 1st year at Uni. Mainly because I got fed up with using their noisy and clunky Monro-Matic mechanical calculators that occupied a good portion of each student's desk.
I recall around the same time I acquired my very first portable AM/FM/SW transistor radio complete with (mono) headphones. How times change.