After selecting an OS ("Reboot on Selection" active), system reboots to OS Selection anyway

#1
Dear Support,

Situation: PC with dual boot: Windows 10 Pro 64-bit (default OS) and Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit.

After a few weeks of happy usage of iReboot and EasyBCD, a problem has arisen. When I select an OS (either Win7 or Win10) -with the "Reboot on Selection" active- in order to restart into the selected OS directly, the system reboots and displays the OS selection menu anyway, like a "normal" reboot. This ONLY happens when I try to "iReboot" from Windows 7. From Windows 10 it works as it should. Both OS'es have iReboot v2.0.1 + EasyBCD v2.3. The strange thing is that it did work from Windows 7 properly before. I tried reinstalling iReboot and EasyBCD as Administrator, no good. Also erasing and redefining the bootloader did not solve this issue.

Do you have any suggestions? Thank you very much in advance.

Best regards,
Paul
 
Last edited:

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#2
Hey Paul.

I'm sorry to hear about that situation! It sounds like you might have two different bootloaders installed. Is there a mix of EFI and MBR installations on this PC?
 
#3
Hi, Mahmoud.

Thank you for your response and for thinking with me.

That's a good point. I did not install any other bootloaders, but I checked anyway: No other programs found of that kind or anything installed on the background. Thanks anyway, I will keep digging. Maybe it has something to do with changed program privileges or something...

Best regards,
Paul
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#4
I actually meant two instances of the default Windows BCD bootloader. Is there a mix of EFI and MBR installations on this PC?
 
#5
Hi, Mahmoud,

Thank you for your response. You might be on the right track here.

All hard disks have a GPT partition style:
- Disk 0 is an SSD drive, consisting of 2 physical SSD's in RAID 0. It forms the drive that contains both Windows 7 and Windows 10 installations.
- Disk 1 is a classic 4 TB HDD.

The boot partition of Disk 0 is an "EFI System Partition" in Disk Management.

But here it comes: there is one USB key (Disk 2) -permanently connected to the back side of the computer- that indeed has an MBR partition style. Could that be the reason? Should I convert the USB key to another partition style type if possible (or just take it out)?

Thanks again.

Best regards,
Paul
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#6
It depends on whether your bios has USB device boot enabled. The easiest way is to obviously temporarily remove the USB stick and see if that takes care of the error.

I'd be more concerned with whether there's an active partition on Disk 1 with a `BOOT` folder in the root.
 
#7
Thanks for your help. I tried that but it did not make a difference. Also, there's no active partition with a Boot directory on Disk 1 or any other disk or partition.

A new "feature" is that two new entries appear in the OS Selection menu when I right-click the iReboot icon in the Taskbar: "Intel Volume 1" and "ST4000DM005-2DP166". Those I don't recognize. I cannot say when these entries appeared, but it most likely after I uninstalled/reinstalled iReboot and EasyBCD on both partitions. I cannot delete them in EasyBCD. I only see Windows 10 and Windows 7 as MBR entries in EasyBCD.

Other actions done: I erased by MBR and I redefined it using the bootrec command on Windows Repair Command Prompt the Windows 10 bootup USB drive. Could this have "messed up" something that caused the Windows 7 partition not to boot into the selected OS anymore?

Additional info:
- On the Windows 10 partition, iReboot boots to the selected OS, only Windows 7 doesn't;
- Disk 0 (see above) contains the following partitions: one EFI (boot) partition, one Windows 10 partition, one Windows 7 partition, one partition used for data and two 900 MB partitions that I cannot acces or assign a drive letter to using the Disk Management (either in Win 10 or Win 7). They may have been created (I'm not sure) when I tried to install a third OS (Windows XP which failed because of the EFI boot mode). In the BIOS I did not find a way to disable UEFI/secure boot. I'm a little reluctant to do this anyway, because I read horror stories on the internet when this was done.

Can I try/risk deleting these two remaining 900 MB partitions using Fdisk on a bootable drive?

Thanks in advance.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#8
You did turn off fast boot for Windows 10, right?