Endless boot in Windows 10

#1
Hello all,
with EAsyBCD I installed on a HDD 3 bootable partition
- Windows 10 : original installation and transferred to an SSD drive : both are functional
- a XP : functional too, but boot twice : no matter it's ok for me
- another windows 10 : this partition is cloned from the SSD one: here is the issue : boot starts with the splash screen, 5 minutes of activity on the HDD + mouse cursor and then stops.
Thanks for an idea to solve this.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#2
Can you post a screenshot of your Disk Management and the contents of EasyBCD "view settings" (detailed mode)
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#4
My understanding is that you can boot C, W and Y, but that V hangs when you try to boot it.
You make no mention of X and I can see no BCD entry for it.
Have you tried booting that yet ?
I can't see any obvious problem with the screenshots you provided, if my French translation is correct.
Perhaps you could add to the French translation here
Disk Management Flags (multilingual - please add your language)
if you have spare moment later.
When you say "splash screen", exactly how far along this timeline are you when everything stops ?

1.After pressing the power button, the PC’s firmware initiates a Power-On Self Test (POST) and loads firmware settings. This pre-boot process ends when a valid system disk is detected.
2.Firmware reads the master boot record (MBR), and then starts Bootmgr.exe. Bootmgr.exe finds and starts the Windows loader (Winload.exe) on the Windows boot partition.
3.Essential drivers required to start the Windows kernel are loaded and the kernel starts to run, loading into memory the system registry hive and additional drivers that are marked as BOOT_START.
4.The kernel passes control to the session manager process (Smss.exe) which initializes the system session, and loads and starts the devices and drivers that are not marked BOOT_START.
5.Winlogon.exe starts, the user logon screen appears, the service control manager starts services, and any Group Policy scripts are run. When the user logs in, Windows creates a session for that user.
6.Explorer.exe starts, the system creates the desktop window manager (DWM) process, which initializes the desktop and displays it.
 
#5
-The partition X is not a bootable one. It's an image only of the C: before 1809 upgrade, just in case of...
and is not part of the list of bootable OS
- the splash screen is the blue blie "rectangle" of Windows 10.
- Phases of boot :
  • the splash screen is displayed during about 30 sec
  • there is an "intensive" activity on the HDD during 10 min
  • followed by a degressive one that I stopped by resetting the PC after 50 min.
  • during tha all process the mouse pointer changed from Arrow to a rotating circle to both.
- This HD is a new one but at the second next startup the partition "V" was checked for errors. None were found. I manually re)chkdsk wit the same result.

I join the english version of the 3 screenshots
 

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Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#6
It sounds like you are in step 3 or 4 and for some reason unable to load the necessary drivers, which I would guess to be a problem in the cloning process. Check the small-print of the partition management software you used. They tend to have multiple different ways of creating copies of an OS, from a genuine clone, to a heavily modified copy depending on which command you used.
If you're getting that far, it's past the bootmgr phase successfully.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#8
I just know from experience of many partition managers (some time ago now - I haven't had cause to move an OS to a new drive in years), that they provide several alternative ways of doing so, and some of them are only suitable for data partitions not Operating Systems, some will copy an OS but modify both it and its BCD entry and some will create a true "clone" (identical in every respect, which may require user intervention to make it bootable on a new drive (the BCD contains information about the drive signature)).
I don't have up to date information on your particular software choice, but a careful reading of the small-print in the documentation for the "copy" command you used should reveal if it's designed to move an OS or not.
iirc backup/restore to a new location will generally be OK to preserve the integrity of an OS.