How can I fix issues with EasyBCD?

Noar

New Member
#1
I would deeply appreciate anyone's help; I know a bit of basic computer stuff but not to mess with registers and in-depth fixing processes.
This is my situation... I have a PC with several drives (1-1TB HDD and 3-SSDs):
  1. My HDD has three partitions: one with some of my files, and two with Windows 8.1Pro each (was planning to upgrade one to Windows 10).
  2. One SSD has Windows 8Pro (in use now), another one (I was normally using) has 8.1Pro but crashed (reason why I started all this repair/recovery journey), and another brand new one that I am using to clone the one that crashed (cloned already but not booting up).
  3. I also have one (not connected) with Vista that crashed long time ago and was planning to clone it, too, if successful with EasyBCD on the one above-mentioned.
Trying to make the new SSD bootable using EasyBCD, I don't know what happened that when I tried to "add a new entry" (been booted on one of the HDD 8.1 partitions) following instructions from a post online (where I got the recommendation for EasyBCD), I was not sure on what I was doing and, when I restarted my computer it didn't reboot anymore. Now I'm using the only one bootable drive (8Pro) I have; hope I don't mess it up.
My issue now (first) is how to recover the "bootability" for the 2-partitions with 8.1Pro in my HDD. Then, how to make also the new SSD bootable. Is there anything possible with EasyBCD to solve this issue? I would like not to spend money on additional software.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#2
"add new entry" does just that and no more.
It adds an entry into the BCD on the currently running system describing the location and type of another system which you wish to be able to dual-boot.
It cannot prevent the system from booting (though if you fail to describe the new system correctly, it won't boot on the gigo principle)
EasyBCD's advanced features however, like other power-user tools such as regedit, are quite capable of doing things which will make the system unbootable if you use them without knowing what you are doing.
Presumably you did more than just "add new entry".
Can you remember what you did ?
 

Noar

New Member
#3
The only thing I remember doing was "add new entry" pointing at the new SSD which has the cloned files from the "crashed" SSD. Although, I did notice that there was already an entry when I opened that option of the EasyBCD menu but cannot remember how it was written; I only added the one previously mentioned. I was hesitant on continuing but didn't quickly find a way to erase the entries and, just following the "shallow" instructions on the other website's blog, decided to continue, screwing up "the whole thing". Is there a "quick" way to re-establish or fix the "bootability" of the HDD?... an option in EasyBCD (or another software) to "fresh-start" the MBR or rearrange/reverse/fix whatever got messed up? Please keep in mind I am no expert on subjects like this; I mostly depend on other people's blogs and websites resources to learn. Thanks.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#4
following the "shallow" instructions on the other website's blog,
?
The instructions for EasyBCD are here
EasyBCD
You use the term "bootable" a little tenuously in your OP and your last post.
In the OP, you appear to mean that you'd like to be able to dual-boot one OS from the boot files of a different OS, i.e. "add an entry" to the BCD.
Then you talk about the "bootability of the HDD" implying that the device itself has lost the ability to boot (the difference e.g. between a movie DVD and a Windows Installation DVD)
What were you doing previous to playing with EasyBCD ?
Were you booting these drives individually by changing/overriding the BIOS ?
Is that what you have lost the ability to do now on one of the devices ?
If so, did you at some point use the "Write MBR" or "Reset BCD" facilities of EasyBCD (ignoring the warning in large scary letters not to reboot without taking further action)
Without a bit more background, it'll be impossible to guess what you might have done, and how to undo it, or whether you are just misunderstanding your present situation.
 

Noar

New Member
#5
Thanks for the instructions; I'll look into them and try to learn about EasyBCD although I don't plan to use it much since I normally don't like messing with technical stuff like that.

This is what happened (will try to put it as simple as possible):
(Note: A few years ago, by researching on the internet, I built my PC and put 3-SSDs and 1-HDD from other computers I had; it has been working wonderfully)​
Recently,
1. The SSD I had been using after building this PC crashed (has Windows 8.1Pro).
2. Then I started using the 1TB HDD which already had two partitions with Windows 8Pro.
3. I upgraded both partitions to 8.1Pro.
(***I started contemplating the idea (but had not done anything yet) of upgrading one of the partitions on the HDD to Windows 10***)​
4. Then, (using AOMEI PA) I cloned the SSD that crashed to a new SSD I had bought a few months ago, but it didn't boot.
5. Looking for information on how to get this new SSD to boot, I found another website/blog where someone recommended EasyBCD and gave some instructions on how to use it but was not too clear for me (don't remember the website); the HDD I was using stopped working after following instructions.
(**reference to my previous post: The only thing I remember doing was "add new entry" pointing at the new SSD which has the cloned files from the "crashed" SSD, although, I did notice that there was already an entry when I opened that option of the EasyBCD menu but cannot remember how it was written; I only added the one previously mentioned. I was hesitant on continuing but didn't quickly find a way to erase the entries and, just following the "shallow" instructions on the other website's blog, decided to continue, screwing up "the whole thing".)​
6. Then, I had to start using this SSD (in use now) with Windows 8Pro, which automatically upgraded/updated to 8.1Pro a couple of days ago.​

What I'm looking for is: (1) try to use my new SSD (clone) as my "working" drive, (2) be able to also boot up from my HDD to then, (3) upgrade one of its partitions to Windows 10.
.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
Additional info (if needed)... **My PC: AMD FX-8350(4.2GHz) 64-bit Processor, 16GB RAM, MSI MS-7640 motherboard, BIOS: American Megatrends Inc V19.9.
OS.. SSD in use now: 8.1Pro 32-bit; HDD: 8.1Pro (1-partition 32-bit / 1-partition 64-bit); 2-SSDs (cloned and clone): 8.1Pro 64-bit.
.......................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................
 
Last edited:

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#6
To reiterate
Were you booting these drives individually by changing/overriding the BIOS ?
Is that what you have lost the ability to do now on one of the devices ?
 

Noar

New Member
#7
I can see all drives in BIOS and can switch between them, but only the one (SSD W8.1Pro) I'm using now boots up. When I try to boot from the others I get a "command-like" screen saying:
Windows failed to start. A recent hardware or software change might be the cause. To fix the problem:
1. Insert your Windows installation disc and restart your computer.
2. Choose your language settings, and then click "Next."
3. Click "Repair your computer."
If you do not have this disc, contact your system administrator or computer manufacturer for assistance.
File: \Boot\BCD
Status: 0xc000000f
Info: The Boot Configuration Data for your PC is missing or contains errors.

I tried "Repair your PC" with the installation disc but it gave me the following message:
Automatic Repair couldn't repair your PC
Press "Advance options" to try other options to repair your PC or "Shut down" to turn off your PC.
Log file: \System32\Logfiles\Srt\SrtTrail.txt

I am able, thou, to access my data files (and even add new files) in the "unbootable" drives. I just bought, a few days ago, a 1TB Seagate SSHD to either move my files to it and use the other drives for fresh OS installs, or, create several "bootable" partitions with various OS versions in it and use the other drives as back ups; not sure yet on what would be best. Since I have at least this SSD I'm using now (TG) I am able to do my regular things, although I would like to fix the others and learn something new while doing it.

**By the way, I am still reading the EasyBCD instructions and making sure I understand things before I do anything else. Thanks.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#8
On the drives which won't boot, where is the "active" flag ?