How do you add Windows 7 to a Windows 8 only pc?

#1
I see that Windows 8 is a supported OS, but I can find no info or EasyBCD user guide for it. I find no information on adding Windows 7 to Windows 8. It is always the other way around. And if I have to install 7 first, I really don’t need a 3rd party boot manager. I know of promotional writings that state boot managers allow hundreds of OS. I just want two, with Windows 8 loaded and THEN Windows 7. Is anyone familiar with this apparently unique situation? Thanks.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#2
EasyBCD is not a 3rd party boot manager.
It's an app to manage the contents of the Vista/7/8 BCD
It's still MS doing the booting.
You can add W7 to W8's BCD in exactly the same way as adding W8 to W7's using EasyBCD.
In fact, only the former will give you a workable dual-boot, not because of any problem with EasyBCD, but because the W7 boot manager does not recognize the digital signature of the W8 boot loader as genuine, so it will refuse to boot it.
When you add W8 to an existing W7, the W8 setup will take over the boot process and replace the W7 boot files with the newer versions, avoiding invalid signature problems.
If you add W7 to an existing W8, there's a danger that W7 might downgrade the boot files and hit the above-mentioned problem.
I can't be explicit that it will happen, because I've never tried it, but it is analogous to the situation with XP installed after Vista/7/8, which is guaranteed to regress the boot and make the newer system(s) unbootable until the boot files have been repaired.
 
#3
I have successfully installed windows 8 to windows 7, but not vice versa. Have not figured out how Easy BCD facilitates this goal. That is my goal.
EasyBCD is not a 3rd party boot manager.
It's an app to manage the contents of the Vista/7/8 BCD
It's still MS doing the booting.
You can add W7 to W8's BCD in exactly the same way as adding W8 to W7's using EasyBCD.
In fact, only the former will give you a workable dual-boot, not because of any problem with EasyBCD, but because the W7 boot manager does not recognize the digital signature of the W8 boot loader as genuine, so it will refuse to boot it.
When you add W8 to an existing W7, the W8 setup will take over the boot process and replace the W7 boot files with the newer versions, avoiding invalid signature problems.
If you add W7 to an existing W8, there's a danger that W7 might downgrade the boot files and hit the above-mentioned problem.
I can't be explicit that it will happen, because I've never tried it, but it is analogous to the situation with XP installed after Vista/7/8, which is guaranteed to regress the boot and make the newer system(s) unbootable until the boot files have been repaired.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#4
EasyBCD has no role to play during the install, no matter which way round you do it.
After you've installed any number of Windows of any description, in any order you choose, EasyBCD will run anywhere you choose and enable you to manipulate the contents of the BCD(s) should you need to.
A standard MS install of XP, Vista,7 and 8 in any combination, in the sequence oldest to newest will automatically multi-boot them together, without the need for any tool like EasyBCD.
EasyBCD can still be used to tidy up, for example the standard install will label the boot options like "Older version of Windows" which you might want (but don't need) to change to "XP".
If you depart from the newer follows older sequence, or you install OSs independently, e.g. to separate HDDs connected one at a time, then no automatic dual-booting will occur and you can use EasyBCD after the installs from any of the systems to insert the others into its boot menu.
It will also repair damage done by installing in the "wrong" sequence
Recovering the Windows Bootloader with EasyBCD - EasyBCD - NeoSmart Technologies Wiki