How to delete old/duplicate Boot Records?

#1
Hello, my first post here...

I've clicked "Change boot drive" and saved everything to the same drive multiple times in an attempt to fix boot problems that I was having. Also I've done "Re-create/repair boot files" several times as well for the same purpose.

Now in my bios there are two boot options named exactly the same way: "WINDOWS BOOT MANAGER (<name of the drive>)" . So it seems like multiple records have been created. When I select the second "WINDOWS BOOT MANAGER" in BIOS - there's no actual boot menu, system restarts.

I've tried to "Reset BSD Configuration" but the duplicate "WINDOWS BOOT MANAGER" is still seen in BIOS.

How can I delete all boot records on all other drives except one?
 
Last edited:

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#2
EasyBCD is not changing the BIOS. It adds, deletes or changes entry in the MS Windows bootmgr's BCD store. You can see what's in there with "view settings".
In Overview mode you will only see the simple picture of your PC (one choice for each OS you are multi-booting).
Detailed (debug) mode will also reveal many other system controlled entries in your BIOS.
With UEFI these can be extensive..
Resist the impulse to "clean them up". The result could be an expensive paper-weight.
If your system is booting normally, ignore anything you consider to be surplus. UEFI/Windows doesn't consider it so.
 
#3
Thanks. I understand that EasyBSD doesn't change bios. But I wanted to remove an entry that confuses the BIOS, a boot menu that's not there. I'll take a look at debug mode to see if I understand anything there without much knowledge.

The reason I started messing with it is that I wanted to install two Win10s in addition to my two Win7 (yes I do need all that). One of the Win 10s was supposed to be on on the same SSD as my two Win 7s, the other on a different HDD. When I installed the one on SSD, it didn't create a record in boot menu. I repeated install, still no record. Then I created it in the EasyBSD from my main Win 7, the record in boot menu is now there but it wouldn't boot into that Win 10, gives that error such as "hardware changed..." I think it can't find the file it was supposed to start loading.

The same with the HDD installation of Win10. I can see that Win10 created a boot record on HDD but not in my boot menu which was created by EasyBSD. Creating a boot menu for HDD Win 10 in EasyBSD results in same error...
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#4
The BIOS detects the presence of either or both of

* A bootable MBR (0xAA55 at the end of the first sector)
* A UEFI bootloader on a FAT32/ESP partition, normally at the path /efi/boot/bootx64.efi

The presence of these flags/files will cause an entry to appear in the BIOS boot menu. The menu is generally dynamically generated, so removing them removes the entry.
 
#5
The BIOS detects the presence of either or both of

* A bootable MBR (0xAA55 at the end of the first sector)
* A UEFI bootloader on a FAT32/ESP partition, normally at the path /efi/boot/bootx64.efi

The presence of these flags/files will cause an entry to appear in the BIOS boot menu. The menu is generally dynamically generated, so removing them removes the entry.
Thanks, however I'm not that knowledgeable as to know how to delete these files...

Anyway, the biggest problem is that Win 10 doesn't appear in boot menu nor does it boot when a boot entry is created for is in EasyBSD, as described above.

Does anyone have any ideas why that's happening?
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#6
Remember that you must multi-boot a W10/W7 mix with the W10 bootmgr. Older versions of bootmgr won't recognize newer versions of Winload (invalid digital signature). but newer bootmgr is fully backward compatible with older Winloads.
If you install W10 on a W7 PC, it will detect the W7 boot files, add itself to the W7 BCD, and replace the bootmgr with its own version (provided that the boot files haven't been hidden from setup) i.e dual-boot is fully automatic without any need for intervention from EasyBCD (though you'll probably want to use it subsequently to edit the "Older version of Windows" type descriptions that the automatic process will generate)
How did you do the installation ?
Did you disconnect anything or otherwise conceal its existence ?
Windows setup is pretty much infallible in auto-dual booting provided that systems are installed in chronological order (W7 before W10 in your case)
 
#7
Remember that you must multi-boot a W10/W7 mix with the W10 bootmgr. Older versions of bootmgr won't recognize newer versions of Winload (invalid digital signature). but newer bootmgr is fully backward compatible with older Winloads.
If you install W10 on a W7 PC, it will detect the W7 boot files, add itself to the W7 BCD, and replace the bootmgr with its own version (provided that the boot files haven't been hidden from setup) i.e dual-boot is fully automatic without any need for intervention from EasyBCD (though you'll probably want to use it subsequently to edit the "Older version of Windows" type descriptions that the automatic process will generate)
How did you do the installation ?
Did you disconnect anything or otherwise conceal its existence ?
Windows setup is pretty much infallible in auto-dual booting provided that systems are installed in chronological order (W7 before W10 in your case)
Well, in my case Win 10 did not add itself into bootmgr just nothing happened. I didn't disconnect anything, just installed it on a different partition of the same SSD.

That's why I'm thinking maybe there are two bootmgr records, that's why my BIOS sees both and Win 10 added itself to a wrong record? This is the reason I wanted to remove the other record...

In the past I remember trying similar installation and Win 10 added itself to bootmgr. In this case I would still need to edit the default "WINDOWS 10" name in boot menu and order of OS options (i e which OS is on top in the boot menu, which is second etc). I don't remember if I succeeded in this. But this time I can't even get any additions to boot menu after installing Win 10.

Would it be possible to edit Win10 boot menu from EasyBSD from Win 7 after Win 10 adds itself into Win 7 bootmgr? I'd like to be able to do so (after I have Win 10 in boot menu anyway).

I tried also installing Win 10 on a separate HDD (while main SSD was connected) - still nothing in boot menu.

If you're the author of EasyBSD, is there a way for you to make EasyBSD compatible with Win 10 bootmgr?
 
Last edited:

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#8
EasyBCD is fully compatible with all versions of Windows. (Mqudsi is the author - I'm just another user).
Let's get back to basics to diagnose your problem.
Can you boot whatever system is working (or systems if more than one) and from each post a copy/paste of the contents of "view settings" in EasyBCD and a screenshot of Disk Management. (make sure you drag the column widths to ensure all the status flags are visible for each partition.)
 
#9
EasyBCD is fully compatible with all versions of Windows. (Mqudsi is the author - I'm just another user).
Let's get back to basics to diagnose your problem.
Can you boot whatever system is working (or systems if more than one) and from each post a copy/paste of the contents of "view settings" in EasyBCD and a screenshot of Disk Management. (make sure you drag the column widths to ensure all the status flags are visible for each partition.)
I will post screenshots tonight. Currently I removed entries of Win 10 from EasyBSD because they didn't work anyway. Do you want me to create those entries before taking a screenshot?

Besides Win10 (that I can't boot to) there are two Win 7, and I can boot to each of them just fine.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#10
Yes add entries like you want it to work, so I can see what's there and why it's not working.
 
#11
Here are screenshots and text from EasyBSD. Forgive me for redacting partition names because they have my name and other info I'd like not to become public.

I also took a shot of BIOS with two Boot Manager entries.

EasyBSD in Main Win 7
----------------------------
There are a total of 4 entries listed in the bootloader.

Default: <NAME REDUCTED #1>
Timeout: 10 seconds
EasyBCD Boot Device: C:\

Entry #1
Name: <NAME REDUCTED #1>
BCD ID: {current}
Drive: C:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #2
Name: <NAME REDUCTED #2>
BCD ID: {7d336460-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
Drive: K:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #3
Name: Win 10 on Main SSD
BCD ID: {7d336461-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
Drive: E:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #4
Name: Recovery Win 10 on HDD
BCD ID: {7d336462-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
Drive: H:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

-----------------------------------------------------

EasyBSD in Second Win 7 (in this OS I didn' have time to copy the text after I added Win 10 records from Main OS):
---------------------------------------------------------
There are a total of 2 entries listed in the bootloader.

Default: STAS GENERAL
Timeout: 10 seconds
EasyBCD Boot Device: D:\

Entry #1
Name: <NAME REDUCTED #1>
BCD ID: {default}
Drive: I:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

Entry #2
Name: <NAME REDUCTED #2>
BCD ID: {current}
Drive: C:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.efi

-------------------------------------------------------
The Main SSD (the one I have two Win 7s and trying to install a Win 10 to), is still MBT, all other disks are GPT. Is that the reason why I'm having that warning message each time I open EasyBSD (see screenshot)? This message started popping up recently, I'm not sure what I did to make it start coming up. I'm not sure if I should convert that main system SSD to GPT without risking any data.
 

Attachments

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#12
The mix of MBR/BIOS and UEFI/GPT is giving you the problem.
Have a read of this for what the restrictions are about mixing them
Windows and GPT FAQ
There's no "active" flag in UEFI/GPT, you should see an EFI system partition dm.JPG
You're shown as booting via C (system active flags) which is MBR, but your EasyBCD view claims to be loading winload.efi for C (UEFI) instead of winload.exe.(MBR). That would fail, so it looks like you're not even working on the correct BCD.
Check EasyBCD >Tools > Options and make sure you aren't auto-loading an offline BCD.
EasyBCD >file > load system BCD will make sure you're looking in the right place (and editing it)
Also, please use detailed mode in view settings. You are shown as using D as EasyBCD boot device which isn't even in your config and refers to the location of EasyBCD specific boot files, not the system ones which detailed mode will show.
No rush.
I'm off to a very late bed, shall not see any reply tonight.
 
#13
Wow, so many things... before I get to most of them, let me post the Detailed View on EasyBSD from main Win 7, which is easy to do.

Code:
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier              {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
device                  boot
description             Windows Boot Manager
locale                  en-US
inherit                 {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
default                 {7d33645f-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
resumeobject            {1f8184a2-14de-11df-9734-f08c6d8c50b0}
displayorder            {7d33645f-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
                        {7d336460-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
                        {7d336461-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
                        {7d336462-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
toolsdisplayorder       {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
timeout                 10

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {7d33645f-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <NAME REDACTED1>
locale                  en-US
osdevice                partition=C:
systemroot              \Windows
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {7d336460-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
device                  partition=K:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <NAME REDACTED1>
locale                  en-US
osdevice                partition=K:
systemroot              \Windows
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {7d336461-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
device                  partition=E:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             Win 10 on Main SSD
locale                  en-US
osdevice                partition=E:
systemroot              \Windows

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {7d336462-0f7b-11ea-a372-7085c2d8bbe0}
device                  partition=H:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             Recovery Win 10 on HDD
locale                  en-US
osdevice                partition=H:
systemroot              \Windows
 
Last edited by a moderator:
#14
There's no "active" flag in UEFI/GPT, you should see an EFI system partition.
Sorry, I don't understand. Do you mean that an EFI must be flagged as Active? How do you see in Disk Management that a partition is MBR or UEFI/GPT? In your picture C drive is not Active... I don't get it....

You're shown as booting via C (system active flags) which is MBR, but your EasyBCD view claims to be loading winload.efi for C (UEFI) instead of winload.exe.(MBR). That would fail, so it looks like you're not even working on the correct BCD.
But these two Win 7s load fine, if it's impossible to load winload.efi in MBR, why is it working in my case?

Check EasyBCD >Tools > Options and make sure you aren't auto-loading an offline BCD.
That option is not checked, I'm not auto-loading an offline BCD.

EasyBCD >file > load system BCD will make sure you're looking in the right place (and editing it)
Just did that. It didn't change anything, at least I'm not noticing any difference.

Also, please use detailed mode in view settings. How does it look to you? Any issues?
Please see my post above with Detailed Mode settings of my Main Win7.

You are shown as using D as EasyBCD boot device which isn't even in your config and refers to the location of EasyBCD specific boot files, not the system ones which detailed mode will show.
That is taken from ANOTHER OS, not the main OS. Since you've asked to to copy/paste EasyBSD configurations from both systems, I did that. In Main OS boot drive is shown in EasyBSD as C, in another OS it's shown as D in EasyBSD, is that wrong? The system Drive is of course C in both OSs. I just posted Disk Management screenshot of Main OS only, but EasyBSD setting from both OSs.

What should I do? Please help... Should I just convert this SSD with 3 OSs to GPT? Is there a risk not booting after the convertion? Should I make backups of boot record to a flashdrive with EasyBSD? I've never done that.

I'm used to MiniTool Partition Wizard, should I use it to convert to GPT?
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#15
"active" is the only physical bit i.e it's a "1" set in one bit position of the one (and only one) of the four partitions in the Partition Table in the MBR and is there whether the PC is runnning or powered down. "system" and "boot" are virtual flags i.e. they're the running OS reporting to you on the status of how the OS was booted.

"boot" = "this is the system you're running"
"system" = "this is where I found the boot files for the currently running system"
"active" (on the first HDD in the BIOS boot sequence) = "this is where I started the search for the boot files"
"active" (on subsequent HDDs in the BIOS boot sequence) ="this is where I will look if I don't find something in the MBR on the first HDD"

There is no working MBR on a GPT disk (just a guard pseudo MBR to protect the disk from being mistakenly reformatted by a legacy OS) hence no active partition because there's no partition table. UEFI/GPT uses the EFI System Partition as the location for the boot files.

You didn't post DM screenshots for each successful boot so I couldn't see how your status flags/disk letters differed between boots, but I guess that whatever blacked out partition you booted second became C and saw the previous C as D in its registry map.

Read the MS FAQ link I gave earlier, It explains in far more depth than I can manage here what the restrictions are about mixing MBR/GPT (fine for data, but problematic for bootable OSs, including whether you've installed 32 or 64 bit versions)
 
#16
Terry60, Thank you very much for your advice! Because of your help, I've got some progress but not quite there yet.

So... I created a rescue media within Minitools Partition Wizard, booted from it and converted the main SSD to GPT. At first nothing booted at all.. all boot records were gone.. I booted with Paragon Hard Disk Manager and used their "repair boot" menu. After several attempts of playing with Paragon settings, it eventually repaired boot menu, giving it two default names "Window 7". I booted into Main Win 7, opened EasyBSD and did File - Load System BSD just to be sure. Then I modified boot order and names.

Then I Installed Win 10 on this main SSD. It created it's own blue-screen boot menu with big icons, adding itself to my boot menu. Then I booted into Main Win 7, opened EasyBSD, did File - Load System BSD, and moved newly added Win 10 to be last on the menu list (as I wanted) and renamed it.

Now all 3 OSs seem to be booting, but I've got these two additional boot menu entries (see picture) that are dead - error message comes up when I click on them. I've used EasyBSD from all 3 OSs I now have, each time used File - Load System BSD, and these two additional menu items are not there. But they are in the actual boot menu. How do I remove them??? Is that boot records from other drives? How do I remove all of the extra ones?

Also, for the information: the boot options in BIOS still include THREE duplicate entries for the same SSD with same name "Windows Boot Manager". Two of them are dead - nothing loads from them. The other one works but bring the menu with those two extra dead entries.


I'm also including EasyBSD settings (regular and detailed) from all 3 systems. Again, File - Load System BSD was used in EasyBSD on each OS.

In Disk Management screenshot you'll see duplicate drives, that's because I've packed up my main OS to a HDD prior to converting it to GPT. I haven't deleted that backup drive yet.



Code:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Main Win 7 Detailed settings:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier              {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume9
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager
locale                  en-US
inherit                 {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
default                 {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
resumeobject            {dd80a442-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
displayorder            {939bf9c2-138b-11ea-9064-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a9-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a5-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a7-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1ab-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a8-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1ac-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
                        {dd80a441-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
                        {dd80a443-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
toolsdisplayorder       {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
timeout                 10

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {939bf9c2-138b-11ea-9064-806e6f6e6963}
device                  partition=J:
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a9-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a5-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a7-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1ab-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             USB

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a8-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1ac-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <REDACTED1> GENERAL
locale                  \en-US
osdevice                partition=C:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {f431a1ad-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a441-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=K:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <REDACTED2>  SOUND STUDIO
locale                  \en-US
osdevice                partition=K:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {2332a6c1-13c0-11ea-86b7-806e6f6e6963}
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a443-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=E:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             Win 10 on Main SSD
locale                  ru-RU
inherit                 {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
recoverysequence        {dd80a444-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
recoveryenabled         Yes
isolatedcontext         Yes
allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
osdevice                partition=E:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {dd80a442-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
nx                      OptIn
bootmenupolicy          Standard






-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Second Win 7 Detailed settings:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier              {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume9
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager
locale                  en-US
inherit                 {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
default                 {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
resumeobject            {dd80a442-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
displayorder            {939bf9c2-138b-11ea-9064-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a9-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a5-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a7-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1ab-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a8-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1ac-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
                        {dd80a441-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
                        {dd80a443-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
toolsdisplayorder       {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
timeout                 10

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {939bf9c2-138b-11ea-9064-806e6f6e6963}
device                  partition=N:
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a9-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
device                  partition=I:
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a5-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a7-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1ab-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             USB

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a8-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1ac-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=I:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <REDACTED1> GENERAL
locale                  \en-US
osdevice                partition=I:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {f431a1ad-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a441-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <REDACTED2> SOUND STUDIO
locale                  \en-US
osdevice                partition=C:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {2332a6c1-13c0-11ea-86b7-806e6f6e6963}
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a443-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=L:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             Win 10 on Main SSD
locale                  ru-RU
inherit                 {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
recoverysequence        {dd80a444-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
recoveryenabled         Yes
isolatedcontext         Yes
allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
osdevice                partition=L:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {dd80a442-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
nx                      OptIn
bootmenupolicy          Standard



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
New Win 10 Detailed settings:
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier              {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume9
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager
locale                  en-US
inherit                 {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
default                 {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
resumeobject            {dd80a442-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
displayorder            {939bf9c2-138b-11ea-9064-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a9-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a5-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a7-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1ab-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1a8-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {f431a1ac-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
                        {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
                        {dd80a441-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
                        {dd80a443-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
toolsdisplayorder       {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
timeout                 10

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {939bf9c2-138b-11ea-9064-806e6f6e6963}
device                  partition=L:
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a9-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
device                  partition=D:
path                    \EFI\MICROSOFT\BOOT\BOOTMGFW.EFI
description             Windows Boot Manager

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a5-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a7-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1ab-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             USB

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1a8-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Firmware Application (101fffff)
-------------------------------
identifier              {f431a1ac-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
description             Hard Drive

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a440-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=D:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <REDACTED1> GENERAL
locale                  \en-US
osdevice                partition=D:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {f431a1ad-13bf-11ea-a603-806e6f6e6963}
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a441-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=E:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             <REDACTED2>  SOUND STUDIO
locale                  \en-US
osdevice                partition=E:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {2332a6c1-13c0-11ea-86b7-806e6f6e6963}
quietboot               Yes

Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier              {dd80a443-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
device                  partition=C:
path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
description             Win 10 on Main SSD
locale                  ru-RU
inherit                 {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
recoverysequence        {dd80a444-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
recoveryenabled         Yes
isolatedcontext         Yes
allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
osdevice                partition=C:
systemroot              \Windows
resumeobject            {dd80a442-13d8-11ea-8001-6d7368757261}
nx                      OptIn
bootmenupolicy          Standard
 

Attachments

Last edited by a moderator:

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#17
I've not seen that before in a bootmgr menu, but the detailed EasyBCD view shows the kind of additional entries typical of UEFI.
I suspect that the menu displays them because it's finding them in the BIOS and if you remove the dead entries from there , they'll no longer appear in the menu.
 
#18
I've not seen that before in a bootmgr menu, but the detailed EasyBCD view shows the kind of additional entries typical of UEFI.
I suspect that the menu displays them because it's finding them in the BIOS and if you remove the dead entries from there , they'll no longer appear in the menu.
But is there a way to remove entries from BIOS? There's no such option in my BIOS... I can select on of them, but can't remove others.

Also, is there a way to remove bootmgr from a disk other than the disk I'm booted from? Like from Windows? I suspect that some of these boot menus are from other drives. How do I remove these from bother drives if booting to them isn't an option?
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#19
Try enabling "Expert Mode" in EasyBCD's options dialog.

The extra entry is coming from your UEFI firmware, injected into the Windows bootloader by the bidirectional integration. Expert Mode enables modification of firmware-resident entries, but is rarely more helpful than harmful - this might be such a case, however.

Otherwise, you can almost certainly go into your UEFI firmware menu and remove the extra (or all) boot manager entries from the boot options page; the valid entries will be recreated (and hopefully only once each) on next boot.

It is also possible that you have multiple disks with multiple EFI system partitions or even one disk with multiple FAT32 partitions and the UEFI firmware (aka BIOS) is picking them up as separate entries, in which case you'll need to clean that up first.