Option 3: Use GRUB2 EFI as your main boot manager

mbabli

New Member
#1
I hope easyBCD will solve my problem:
I bought a brand new laptop Asus ROG G752VY-GC162T i7-6700HQ/16GB/1TB 128SSD/GTX980M/17.3. It has an original Windows 10 with it. I wanted to have ubuntu-16.04, with a dual boot for both Operating systems. That was a very easy task in Windows 7.
In my case I shrunk one partition of and I downloaded the Ubuntu 16.04 ISO, and I made a live usb using Rufus.
I restarted my laptop and entered the BIOS, I disabled Quick Boot and Secure Boot. I also chose the boot order priority to make UEFI:USB the first choice (I am sure that Windows 10 was installed with UEFI - I checked that already) and then I disabled 'Quick Boot on shutdown' in Windows 10.
Afterwards, I restarted my PC and booted from the Live USB, Ubuntu installer showed up. I selected the free space partition I made earlier, and clicked + to add a SWAP partition equal to my RAM (16 GB), and another separate 2 GB as boot, and another one with the rest of the space as a '/' (root). I choose the '/' partition and clicked install. The installation started and the only option in the prompt was restart, so I clicked restart.
The laptop is now directly booting into Windows 10.

i have read in EasyBCD page: EasyBCD and UEFI
Option 3: Use GRUB2 EFI as your main boot manager
EasyBCD controls the Windows boot menu, and has traditionally been used as the primary boot manager. With EasyBCD, it is possible to add entries for Linux and older versions of Windows to the top-level BCD menu seen when your machine first boots. Since the Windows boot manager running in UEFI mode does not support the loading of legacy and non-Microsoft operating systems, another option is possible.

When installing Linux or any other 3rd party OS that ships with its own bootloader, instead of choosing to install GRUB to the bootsector as is traditionally done when opting to use EasyBCD to control your boot menu, choose to install GRUB to the MBR (or disk, in this case) and make it the main bootloader for your PC. You can add the Windows boot menu to the GRUB2 EFI boot menu – in this case, you’ll see GRUB’s boot menu when your PC starts, and from there you can choose Windows. You can still use EasyBCD to control the Windows boot menu and set up multi-boots and re-configure Vista+ entries in the BCD boot menu, but with the GRUB2 EFI menu loading first, you can use that to boot into Linux and to chainload NTLDR to boot into Windows 9x.

i would like to do that but i did not understand the way.
kindly please provide me with a more detailed version. for example:
1- "With EasyBCD, it is possible to add entries for Linux" (how?)
2- "instead of choosing to install GRUB to the bootsector as is traditionally done when opting to use EasyBCD to control your boot menu, choose to install GRUB to the MBR (or disk, in this case) and make it the main bootloader for your PC" (the sentence "choose to install GRUB to the MBR (or disk, in this case) and make it the main bootloader for your PC" how to install GRUB to the MBR what disk are you talking about.
Sincere regards
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#2
EasyBCD cannot solve your problem on a UEFI PC.
That is the point of the wiki article you quote.
1- "With EasyBCD, it is possible to add entries for Linux" (how?)
This only applies to non-UEFI installations
"choose to install GRUB to the MBR (or disk, in this case) and make it the main bootloader for your PC" how to install GRUB to the MBR what disk are you talking about.
When you install Linux it will give you the option to take control of the boot process (or not).
You need to let it take control.
It will do the rest.