Will Skipping Bootloader leave me stuck?

#1
The short question: If I tick "Skip this bootloader" will the system then take me to my Linux grub bootloader? Or will it do the same thing as removing all the OSs from the bootloader (IE make it impossible to boot)? Currently, trying to boot Linux fails because it cannot find the config file.

The long story: I had an OEM Win7 installation and added Linux Mint 14 in a new partition. BCD wouldn't find my Linux (on the same drive). So I set it to "Skip this Bootloader". It then skipped the bootloader and went to the Linux bootloader. All was fine. But then Windows started giving me a BSOD (ntoskrnl.exe corrupted) and I tried removing all of the OS's so it would go straight to the Linux bootloader. (okay, I'm stupid, the program warned me). I learned my lesson the hard way and had to reinstall. But I cannot get to Linux from BSD now. What will happen if I click "Skip this bootloader"? Will I ever be able to get back to windows if the Linux bootloader is also not working. I think it's time to buy your bootloader tool.

I've tried using all of the grub options. I see that there are ways to set up the NeoGrub that might help, but I'm afraid to screw that up to.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#2
"Skip the boot menu" is an option to suppress the display of the boot menu if you have only one choice but bootmgr (incorrectly) displays a menu anyway.
Don't use it for anything else.
It won't skip to a different boot manager, it just skips displaying a menu.
Whats the problem trying to chain to Linux ?
 
#3
"Skip the boot menu" is an option to suppress the display of the boot menu if you have only one choice but bootmgr (incorrectly) displays a menu anyway.
Don't use it for anything else.
It won't skip to a different boot manager, it just skips displaying a menu.
Whats the problem trying to chain to Linux ?
You'll have to tell me what "chain to Linux" means. Right now it looks for the config file for the Linux installation but doesn't find it. I can try to boot linux from a CD so I can see where the config file actually is, but it seems odd.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#4
The whole boot process is referred to as a chain. The BIOS locates the boot disk, the tiny Initial Program Loader code embedded within the MBR at the start of that disk locates the active partition and links to the boot sector in that partition, which links to the OS boot manager (here's your menu) which links either to to the Windows boot loader, or to the Linux boot manager which in turn does its thing.

How did you specify the Linux entry in the BCD ?
What message does it give you when you try to go to Linux from the boot menu ?
Please paste the contents of EasyBCD > View Settings (detailed mode)
 
#5
The whole boot process is referred to as a chain. The BIOS locates the boot disk, the tiny Initial Program Loader code embedded within the MBR at the start of that disk locates the active partition and links to the boot sector in that partition, which links to the OS boot manager (here's your menu) which links either to to the Windows boot loader, or to the Linux boot manager which in turn does its thing.

How did you specify the Linux entry in the BCD ?
What message does it give you when you try to go to Linux from the boot menu ?
Please paste the contents of EasyBCD > View Settings (detailed mode)
Thanks for your help with this, Terry. I did read the documentation on the chain idea. AI guess I missed the idea that there is a boot loader before the Windows or Linux boot loaders.
I selected Grub 2 and "Use BCD's copy of Grub" and it wants to locate the partition for me. If I don't use BCD's grub, I select Parition 4, where my Linux is. When I tell it where to go (No Neo BCD Grub), I just get a cursor flashing, no > or anything, just _
Otherwise, it seems to look for grub.conf

Windows Boot Manager
--------------------
identifier {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
device partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1
description Windows Boot Manager
locale en-US
inherit {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
default {1cc65ce0-a2e1-11e1-af42-8c89a5d3cdc0}
resumeobject {1cc65cdf-a2e1-11e1-af42-8c89a5d3cdc0}
displayorder {1cc65ce0-a2e1-11e1-af42-8c89a5d3cdc0}
{11487412-8670-11e2-b2d7-8c89a5d3cdc0}
toolsdisplayorder {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
timeout 10
displaybootmenu Yes


Windows Boot Loader
-------------------
identifier {1cc65ce0-a2e1-11e1-af42-8c89a5d3cdc0}
device partition=C:
path \Windows\system32\winload.exe
description Windows 7
locale en-US
inherit {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
recoverysequence {11487409-8670-11e2-b2d7-8c89a5d3cdc0}
recoveryenabled Yes
osdevice partition=C:
systemroot \Windows
resumeobject {1cc65cdf-a2e1-11e1-af42-8c89a5d3cdc0}
nx OptIn
pae Default
sos No
debug No


Real-mode Boot Sector
---------------------
identifier {11487412-8670-11e2-b2d7-8c89a5d3cdc0}
device partition=C:
path \NST\nst_linux.mbr
description Linux

Addendum

Okay! I'm writing to you from Linux, hooray! I went carefully through the directions again and found that I neglected to do the "write to the MBR" step. Now it is chained from one bootloader to the next (seems a bit clunky, but... ) So thanks again for your help and I think I'm up and running. I couldn't have done it without talking it through with someone!