Windows xp and 7 boot problems

#1
Windows xp was on drive c now it is showing up on drive d and 7 was on drive d now it is drive c. I can no longer boot into either o/s I get missing ntldr I can boot into using a windows 7 boot disk is there anything I can do to redirect the o/s systems to the proper boot path? I tried changing the letter in advance settings in easy CBS with no luck same message missing ntldr any help greatly appreciated


Thanks
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#2
There are no letters in the BCD. The letters you see in EasyBCD are translations of the unreadable UID that the BCD uses into the familiar letters as the running system sees them.
If you change those letters, you are pointing to the wrong place, and the system will not boot.
Disk letters are not physical labels. They're just entries in the registry of the running system associating a virtual label for the partition/device for that copy of Windows only.
Each copy of Windows keeps its own map of letters. There is absolutely no connection between them or any reason why they should correspond with each other.
Are you worried that one system sees the other by a different letter than it sees itself, or have both systems suddenly decided that their own letter has changed ?
If the former, that's perfectly normal.
If the latter, what have you just done to the system to cause a problem ?
More detail please.
 
#3
I updated the bios and the drive letters changed both systems decided to change drive letters my xp drive was c became d my windows 7 drive was d became c now both systems do not boot I can get into windows 7 using a paragon boot disk if you need more info let me know what you need.

Thanks
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#4
Firstly check the BIOS HDD boot sequence if the systems are on different HDDs to check that you haven't started trying to boot from the wrong one.
When you boot into W7 using the Paragon disk, is it working properly ? If the letter has changed internally it will hang early on (but is fixable). If it works normally the letter by which it calls itself must be as it originally was.