Audigy 4 Digital Audio in XP 32-bit

Panch

New Member
#1
Hello :smile:

Here is my problem: I've just purchased an Nvidia 260 GTX GPU that has the option of connecting an SPDIF in from an audio source to get sound + video on an HDMI cable to a TV.

I have tried this with 2 card, Audigy 4 (which has a 2-pin JP1) I'm assuming it's for SPDIF but no word back from Creative yet and no reference to it in the manual. This just gives popping sounds on the TV.

Also tried it with the Asus A8V-XE SoundMax onboard sound to actually get distorted sound. Closer but still no good. Funny thing is, when I disable to the 'Digital Audio' using the SoundMax tools, it goes back to the popping that the Creative gave.

So either I'm not connecting to the right port on the Audigy (may not have one) or I need to turn on the digital audio for the Audigy somewhere and dunno where.

One thing to note is the cable that came with the 260 is a 2 pin cable, the connection on the mobo is 3 pin. I connected the two to the SPDIF out and Ground, assuming the +5V power would be supplied by my GPU.

Thanks in advance!
 

Mak 2.0

Mod...WAFFLES!?!?
Staff member
#2
Hello,

Did you check in the Control Panel under the sound option to see if you have Digital Audio setup? That would be my first thing to check and make sure Windows is setup to output Digital Sound.

Cheers,
Mak

Welcome to NeoSmart Technologies!
 

Ex_Brit

If you're going through hell, keep going.
Staff member
#3
I've been reading this with interest and wish I could help as I have the same card, but unfortunately I don't use digital audio.
Have you also posted for help at Creative's Forums?
http://forums.creative.com/creativelabs/
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#4
Panch, you'll need to connect the standard audio out from your audio card to the SPDIF connector (a standard RCA-to-3.5mm cable should do the trick?) and enable digital audio in the Windows Vista audio control panel. It's probably a good idea to connect your audio card to a pair of digital speakers directly to ensure that digital audio is being correctly outputted by your PC before putting the video card in the middle between the two.