Dualbooting working, but system feels unstable

GDH

New Member
#21
Terry

Thanks for the advice. I did do a 2nd partition. This showed that the original partition was corrupted as it was grabbing twice the space it used to do. I installed vista on the 2nd partition and this proved that the vista disc was working. So deleted the corrupted vista and new vista partition and installed vista on a completely fresh hard disk and I am up and running again! Before I install XP, should I install HnS so that XP does not delete all my Vista restore points?

I didn't relaise that the Brown Wizard had been assigned by the forum, but wizard certainly does apply.

Thanks

Gareth
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#22
If you install XP and repair the Vista bootloader before you do any customization of Vista (Install new software etc), then you won't need Vista's recovery points since there's really nothing to go back for.
That'll make it easier to run HnS, as I don't think it'll work well if you've got no XP system to point it at, and if you pretend you've got one, then install XP in the space you pretended was XP (are you following this ?), then the XP installation will overwrite some of what HnS did !
Just resign yourself to the loss of your first Vista points, safe in the knowledge that all future ones will be safe. (they'd probably be gone in a week anyway by the natural order of things. (fifo)

Thanks for the kind words btw.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#23
It's a really bad idea to install HnS before installing another OS. While it's technically possible to preserve the Vista restore points by using HnS in a certain way before installing XP, the mess your MBR will be left in (partially HnS, partially NTLDR) isn't worth it.
 
#24
hide partitions

listen to Guru,
install the first o/s first on a partition.
install the second o/s on the second partition
run HnS
then install your programs (installing some programs on D will still result in some data being dumped on C) this is where you prevent cross contamination of programs
 

GDH

New Member
#25
HnS vs EasyBCD

Terry

Help! In previous posts you have referred to HnS. I have read all the posts in that thread and there seems to be several problems! Why shouldn't I just use the NEOgrub feature within EasyBCD. I am assuming this does the job adequately? I don't have a 2nd PC that I can use adequately when this one breaks and I also run my businees from this one!

Thanks

Gareth
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#26
NeoGrub is the old HnS. HnS is NeoGrub + a lot of improvements made specifically for this task.

HnS only automates the process of sending commands to NeoGrub, both are just as "dangerous" as one-another.

If you're not comfortable running beta software than HnS isn't for you at the moment. However, if you have a partition manager, a Windows DVD, and a Super GRUB Disk CD at hand (links to all three are available) then you should be able to solve any problems encountered. Under no circumstances would your data ever be at risk; worst case scenario is simply an inability to boot into your OS.

I'm pretty comfortable about the latest HnS version (build 45) and highly recommend it over previous builds.
 

GDH

New Member
#27
Thanks CG for the very prompt response!

Having got this far, I am happy to progress as far as possible with "experimentation". I think that my previous posts prove that I will attempt to go as far as possible. Whilst I may not be as adventurous as Terry, I think we are similar in age! I started on Sinclair Spectrums!

I just wanted to know whether EasyBCD or HnS was the best route to go down from here?

My system setup is/will be fairly "normal":

Vista on C: or D: - currently on C:

XP on C: or D: - currently on D:

External HD on whatever

USB sticks on whatever

DVD drive on whatever

Ubuntu will be installed onto a separate primary partition with the swap disk on an exteneded partition.

Then I will want to set up a seperate partition for all data

Willing to be a guines pig, but as I run my business need to know the risks with my set-uo

Thanks

Gareth
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#28
Well you would use EasyBCD to setup the dual-boot with Ubuntu, and HnS to hide Windows Vista from XP in order to protect your system restore points. Provided you don't let Ubuntu write GRUB to the MBR (just follow the Ubuntu instructions step-by-step and you'll be fine) the order taken doesn't matter.

You would only use HnS if you'd like to keep XP from deleting Windows Vista's restore points.
 

GDH

New Member
#29
Thanks CG

Slightly confused by your reference to vista and Vista - assume I can take that as read as Vista to XP?

Assume by your reponse with my set-up I should have no problems any which way. But it is still not easy to to get the Ubuntu install right despite the instructions you attached!

Thanks

Gareth
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#30
Sorry about that. I've updated the post with the right Vista-XP order :smile:

Where exactly did you get stuck with Ubuntu?
 

GDH

New Member
#31
Ubuntu install as 3rd system

Hi CG

The problem is always with the final steps. I can get Ubuntu to install to the correct primary partition, but I can't get grub or the swap disk to go to the right place. I want grub where it should be on a Vista system - nowhere near the MBR - and swap disk on an extended partition. This should then enable me to have:

C:\Vista
D:\XP Home
E:\Ubiuntu

Then Swap file and data on a separate extended disk.

Thanks for any help on getting this right!

Gareth
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#32
Is this all on one HD?
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#34
Well, in this case it should be a straight-forward matter of choosing the partition to install Ubuntu to, then specifying the /dev/sda* notation in the "Advanced" button.

If the installer reports that Ubuntu is being installed to the second partition then GRUB would go to /dev/sda2, etc.

Don't use the default (hd0,x) notation.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#36
Take a look at the guide, it's picture-by-picture, step-by-step.

Step 6 is what we're interested in:
Instead of (hd#) (in our example it was (hd0), but it may be different on your machine) we're going to use /dev/sda1 - the partition we installed Ubuntu to.
You can determine this number by looking at the drive Ubuntu is installed to in the on-screen text (as in the screenshot above) to get the sd* value, then suffix it with the partition number (starting from 1). So if it says sdb and it's the second partiton on the drive, enter /dev/sdb2 at that prompt.
It explains how to determine the right /dev/sd* combo. In your case, we know it's going to be sda* so that's a bit less work.

What did you try in the past?
 

JustinW

Super Moderator
Staff member
#37
So let me see if I'm reading this right GDH. You want to load Ubuntu on your main hard drive with XP and Vista and not install GRUB to the MBR of that disk. Creating partitions for SWAP and Ubuntu are pretty straight forward as long as you use the manual option during setup and shouldn't interfere with XP/Vista. Now, when you get to the last screen and click advanced to specify the location of whare GRUB should be installed, it should be "hd(0,y)" where y = the place where you installed Ubuntu. This should tell the installer that you want GRUB installed to the bootsector as opposed to the MBR. The rest is made simple by adding a Linux entry to Vista's bootmgr with EasyBCD.

If that doesn't work, then it'll be hd(1,y) because the live CD may see itself as disk 0 in the live seesion. If this is the case, add the entry to Vista's BCD like normal. Now when you select it and pass control to GRUB, you won't be able to boot Ubuntu straightaway. This is because menu.lst was saved with hd(1,y) when you installed GRUB and GRUB (When booted now), finds Ubuntu at hd(0,y). Use the edit tool to temp. change it to hd(0,y) and boot Ubuntu. Then make the change to menu.lst to permantely save this parameter.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#38
Gareth, If you only have a single HDD, then don't be afraid of HnS. The reason I keep managing to break it, or it break me, is because of my SATA / IDE mix of disks, and the confused way windows numbers them.
I think that an all SATA or all IDE setup is a piece of cake, and hasn't had problems since about build 2.
The problem with neogrub, is that you've got to do all the numbering/hiding and get it all right, and even then you're stuck with a 2 stage boot for ever. HnS works it all out for you and gives you a neat single boot menu.
 

GDH

New Member
#39
Thanks Terry

From what you have said, I will move to HnS. I do have an external IDE HD and USB sticks, but they are all used for storage, so assume they won't cause a problem.

You mention that you keep all your data files on a separate partition. I want to do that, but need to maintain the security of which user can see which docs as the laptop can be used by up to 3 people. Couldn't find anythin on how to do this with XP. I think I have found a way to do it with Vista. Anything you can suggest?

Thanks

Gareth
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#40
So long as the separate partition is NTFS you should be able to use ACL rules on XP and Vista just fine.