trouble booting vhd.

#1
I have a vhd file i want to dual-boot into with easybcd 'raw hard disk image' option.


The vhd file boots in virtual box and is a fixed size vhd file(200gb). When i click the option at boot i go into a grub terminal(if i type ls it spits out all the files/folders at the root of my win7 installation). Im running win7.

I have tried all the other options in the 'disk image' tab-none of them work.

Q1.would it be possible to convert this vhd into a wim or something that does boot?

Q2. if easybcd dosent support non-windows vhd files are there any programs that do?(im using easybcd 2.1)(seems to me like this was a feature added in 2.1 that should work)

Thanks.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#2
VHD is ONLY Windows 7 support. If you want to use EasyBCD to boot a non-Windows OS, you need to use a non-VHD format (i.e. raw disk image).
 
#3
Oh, ok so i need to convert it to a .img. What is the best way to do that?

EDIT: so i did it with 'dd if= of=' in ubuntu live cd in vbox and it still dosent work. Still going to a grub terminal. :frowning:
 
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#4
VHD is ONLY Windows 7 support. If you want to use EasyBCD to boot a non-Windows OS, you need to use a non-VHD format (i.e. raw disk image).
Could you explain more about Raw Hard Disk and Raw Partition features in EasyBCD? How exactly they work - by adding a menu section to Neogrub? But such menu section would depend on what OS is installed on the image... Or it uses Vboot for that feature?

And for Raw Partition - how its different from Raw Image? Does EasyBCD add MBR & PBR to a "raw partition"? What does this term mean - a partition of unknown format or OS?
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#5
Raw partition means that the image does not contain an MBR, it's just a clone/dump of the partition and not the whole hard disk.

Support for OSes depends on the type. For instance, you won't be able to boot Windows with it because it neither natively supports GRUb-based partition booting nor does it just "sit back" and let someone else do the work. It'll attempt to identify the boot disk and associated hardware, then fail.