XP and Vista Dual Boot, but with a twist

trinite

New Member
#1
Here's my basic situation: My old XP computer died (motherboard fried by faulty power supply), so I bought a new computer, which came with Vista. I'd like to dual boot between my new Vista install on my new drive, and my old XP install on my old drive (which is physically fine; I know because I can see it and open it from my Vista install).

Here's the twist: on my old machine, I had a dual boot between Ubuntu and XP using GRUB. But GRUB was on my Ubuntu drive, not my XP drive, and it clobbered my XP boot loader, so the XP boot files are no longer on my XP disk. I don't have the install disks for either XP or Vista (thanks for nothing, Hewlett-Packard!).

So I discovered EasyBCD. I followed the basic dual boot directions: I added an entry for Windows XP, and I tried the "Reinstall the Vista Bootloader" process. It gives me an error message that the XP boot files are missing, which of course is correct. My Vista drive is C: (it's the boot drive), and my XP drive is K:

Can EasyBCD solve my problem, or do I need to do something else?

(And all that weirdness may make me sound like a multi-booting power user, but I'm really not. The Ubuntu setup was my old Comp-Sci roomate's idea. I'd love step-by-step instructions, if that's possible.)

Thanks so much for the fabulous program and forum!
 

JustinW

Super Moderator
Staff member
#2
Hi trinite, welcome to NST.

Even if you do manage to get the boot files and everything needed to boot XP, it will most likely not work. MS has put in strick piracy safeguards that will crash the OS if it detects it is running on different hardware.

So your options now are to beg HP for an XP disc or borrow a disc from a friend, giving it the product key for your copy during the re-installation.
 
#3
@ Justin: He's already got XP installed on his old drive. He doesn't need an XP CD, unless he wants to reinstall, which it doesn't sound like is the case at the moment.

@ trinite: Yes, you should be able to get it working by downloading the ntldr and NTDETECT.COM files from the following link, and placing them in the root of your "system" partition: Windows XP - NeoSmart Technologies Wiki
And then it'll be a simple matter of creating a boot.ini file, placing that in the root of your "system" partition as well, and creating a new entry pointing at the correct place (with XP selected in the "Type" menu) to boot XP from your Vista bootloader menu.

To create the boot.ini file, use the Notepad application, paste the following text into a new document, and save it as "boot.ini" without the quotes:

[boot loader]
timeout=30
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP Professional" /fastdetect /NOEXECUTE=OPTIN
And replace the rdisk and partition values on both lines with the correct ones in your case. If you feel I should be more clearer, or if you have any questions, then please just ask.

Hope it helps!

-Coolname007
 
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JustinW

Super Moderator
Staff member
#4
Cool, the re-install is so he can get it running on his newer system. While he might already have XP installed on an older drive, XP may not copoerate because of the change of hardware between the two systems.
 
#5
Cool, the re-install is so he can get it running on his newer system. While he might already have XP installed on an older drive, XP may not copoerate because of the change of hardware between the two systems.
I still think he should try it, though, Justin, regardless of the different hardware. Until he does, we simply wont know for sure that it wouldn't work...:wink: I have never heard of this so-called MS feature of crashing the OS if it detects its different hardware, and even IF its true, it doesn't necessarily mean it'll hold true in his case.

@ trinite: I think you should try doing what has been already stated in my last post, and see if it works. Its quite possible you wont have to reinstall anything, and it'll be a simply matter of downloading (and creating your boot.ini) XP boot files, and then creating an entry in EasyBCD to boot it from the Vista boot menu.

-Coolname007
 

trinite

New Member
#6
Thanks to you both.

@kairozamorro: I've heard of the XP crashing on changed hardware thing. Do you think I should try it anyway, or would I likely suffer permanent damage in some way? I.e., is there any risk, besides it just not working?
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#7
It's not that the OS deliberately crashes as a security measure. It's simply that it doesn't know where it is. It's registry is telling it that things are where they were in the old environment, but when it looks for them they're nowhere to be found.
I've successfully moved ME and XP to new systems, but I made sure that all the partitions matched before I attempted to boot the OS.
You're moving the OS from a one HDD to a 2 HDD environment so the partition layout will be unlikely to match. If you had everything on XP in a single C:\ partition, you might get lucky.
You won't do any harm by trying, but things just might not work.
The detection of the fact that you're on new hardware (from a security point of view - the OS will detect new hardware at boot of course and hopefully install appropriate drivers) won't occur until you use WUD, at which time the "genuine advantage" will require that you re-validate. This will also happen if you have to reinstall.
In either case, a simple phone call to the freephone MS number will see you right, provided that the OS with that key isn't in use on any other system.
 
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#8
With all due respect to the posters on this page, most of the advice given lead to ineffective solutions to the problem. I'm afraid you can't do much to boot off of it, unless you do a re-install, and even then, I wouldn't bet my life on it. But here's what you can do next time if you want to move a working partition to another computer, and you still want to boot off of it, as you naturally would have.
First, for some basics. When you try to boot a partition that's been transferred from one PC to another, he will get what is known as a "STOP Error". In essence, his PC will just auto reboot itself just after the BIOS screen finishes making its appearance, and it will continue this mode of rebooting itself for an infinite number of times. Why does this happen? The registry entries and the drivers for the mass storage controller of his old system's OS won't be the same as it should be in the new system. Thus, the new system crashes with no end in sight. What can you do in advance to avoid this? Follow these simple steps :smile:

1) Copy the following information into Notepad, and then save the file as Mergeide.reg, without the .txt file name extension.

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\primary_ide_channel]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="atapi"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\secondary_ide_channel]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="atapi"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\*pnp0600]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="atapi"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\*azt0502]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="atapi"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\gendisk]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E967-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="disk"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#cc_0101]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_0e11&dev_ae33]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1039&dev_0601]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1039&dev_5513]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1042&dev_1000]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_105a&dev_4d33]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1095&dev_0640]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1095&dev_0646]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1095&dev_0646&REV_05]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1095&dev_0646&REV_07]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1095&dev_0648]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1095&dev_0649]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1097&dev_0038]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_10ad&dev_0001]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_10ad&dev_0150]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_10b9&dev_5215]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_10b9&dev_5219]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_10b9&dev_5229]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="pciide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_1106&dev_0571]
"Service"="pciide"
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_8086&dev_1222]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="intelide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_8086&dev_1230]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="intelide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_8086&dev_2411]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="intelide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_8086&dev_2421]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="intelide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_8086&dev_7010]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="intelide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_8086&dev_7111]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="intelide"

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\CriticalDeviceDatabase\pci#ven_8086&dev_7199]
"ClassGUID"="{4D36E96A-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318}"
"Service"="intelide"

;Add driver for Atapi (requires Atapi.sys in Drivers directory)

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\atapi]
"ErrorControl"=dword:00000001
"Group"="SCSI miniport"
"Start"=dword:00000000
"Tag"=dword:00000019
"Type"=dword:00000001
"DisplayName"="Standard IDE/ESDI Hard Disk Controller"
"ImagePath"=hex(2):53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,33,00,32,00,5c,00,44,00,\
52,00,49,00,56,00,45,00,52,00,53,00,5c,00,61,00,74,00,61,00,70,00,69,00,2e,\
00,73,00,79,00,73,00,00,00

;Add driver for intelide (requires intelide.sys in drivers directory)

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\IntelIde]
"ErrorControl"=dword:00000001
"Group"="System Bus Extender"
"Start"=dword:00000000
"Tag"=dword:00000004
"Type"=dword:00000001
"ImagePath"=hex(2):53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,33,00,32,00,5c,00,44,00,\
52,00,49,00,56,00,45,00,52,00,53,00,5c,00,69,00,6e,00,74,00,65,00,6c,00,69,\
00,64,00,65,00,2e,00,73,00,79,00,73,00,00,00


;Add driver for Pciide (requires Pciide.sys and Pciidex.sys in Drivers directory)

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\PCIIde]
"ErrorControl"=dword:00000001
"Group"="System Bus Extender"
"Start"=dword:00000000
"Tag"=dword:00000003
"Type"=dword:00000001
"ImagePath"=hex(2):53,00,79,00,73,00,74,00,65,00,6d,00,33,00,32,00,5c,00,44,00,\
52,00,49,00,56,00,45,00,52,00,53,00,5c,00,70,00,63,00,69,00,69,00,64,00,65,\
00,2e,00,73,00,79,00,73,00,00,00
=- THE END. (DO NOT COPY THIS LINE!) -=

2) Extract the Atapi.sys, Intelide.sys, Pciide.sys, and Pciidex.sys files from your Windows\Driver Cache\I386\Driver.cab file, and copy the files to the Windows\System32\Drivers folder. You do need all 4 of these files for the procedure to succeed. If any of these files are for whatever reason not present, you may extract them from any Windows XP CD, specifically from the i386/Driver.cab file.

3) Time to check back with our old Mergeide.reg file. Go back to the location you saved it and double click it. It will prompt for permission regarding a registry change. Just hit yes.

4) That's all. At this point, you can make an image of this partition and expect to boot off of it after moving it to another system, etc. On your first boot on the new system, you will be bombarded with about a zillion new "Add New Hardware" prompts due to all the new hardware XP thinks has been added at once. :??
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#9
Hi qzack96, welcome to NeoSmart Technologies and thanks for sharing your experience this us. Why don't you drop by our [thread=7]introduction thread[/thread] and say hi?

Your registry hacks are great, but I have one more to add to the mix:
Clear out the HKLM\System\MountedDevices\ list before making the image. Otherwise you cloud have some problems. The MountedDevices key contains a list of partitions and their drive letters, and should be cleared lest the image be restored to the same hard disk but on a different partition resulting in a non-booting system.