Add Win7 To Existing Dual-Boot Vista/XP

Coolname007

Distinguished Member
Also, My Computer will not show any partitions which do not have any drive letters assigned to them. And so consequently, the partitions only show up in Disk Management. Did they have drive letters before?
 

joepwpb

Active Member
Lol, it would have been quicker to just type:

M:

That changes to the root directory on the M: partition. Then you just have to cd to the system32 directory. Its easier. :tongueout:

:smile:You don;t think that wasn't tried??? That didn't work either!!! The only thing that changed the directory was the /d switch.

Joe P

Addendum:

Also, My Computer will not show any partitions which do not have any drive letters assigned to them. And so consequently, the partitions only show up in Disk Management. Did they have drive letters before?

Yes they had drive letters previously. See the screen shot in my first post.

Joe P

Addendum:

Hi Joe,

Usually if you add 7 to Vista bcd using the Vista boot critical files - you get an error booting into 7. The digital signature of 7 winload.exe is not recognised by Vista bootmanagement - presumably because it is newer.

The fix is to do it the other way round - add Vista to 7 bcd - Vista winload.exe is recognized as OK by 7 bootmanagement.

To do that - you can either go thru the steps mentioned by Terry's method - or simply replace the Vista boot critical files with the 7 ones. The bcdboot command you used does the latter.

I don't see how what you are seeing now with drive letters and the one missing driver can result from the bcdboot command.

No one else has come across it.

I certainly don't think the bcdboot command could cause that missing driver but there may be a possibility that it did affect the showing of drive letters in Disk Management because they were there before the use of that command. Could be just a coincidence. It is not a do or die issue because it is the Beta version of 7, but it would be helpful to this forum if we knew . In a few days I'll know if the 7 Final version encounters the same issue.

I'll let you know.

Thanks

Joe P
 
Last edited:

joepwpb

Active Member
I'm Back!!!

I am now in possession of a W7 Professional Upgrade disc and plan on proceeding with adding it to my platform. As you may recall, I currently have a triple boot setup of Win 7 RC, Vista Home Premium and XP Pro, in that order. Since I am using a W7 Professional Upgrade disc I believe that means I have to perform a clean install since I am coming from Vista Premium and not Business. (I have no issue with performing a clean install.) It is my understanding that I will be asked to pick a partition for the install and, if this is correct, I would like to choose a newly created empty partition. My question is, Will this new install be automatically added to the multiboot menu since the bootloader is being handled by W7 RC?

Thanks

Joe P

There are a total of 3 entries listed in the bootloader.

Default: Windows 7
Timeout: 30 seconds.
Boot Drive: E:\
Entry #1
Name: Windows 7
BCD ID: {default}
Drive: M:\
Bootloader Path: \windows\system32\winload.exe

Entry #2
Name: Windows Vista
BCD ID: {current}
Drive: C:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.exe

Entry #3
Name: Microsoft XP PRO
BCD ID: {98bb9bcf-8456-11dd-b036-001060e85d3a}
Drive: E:\
Bootloader Path: \NTLDR
 
Last edited:

joepwpb

Active Member
Hi joe,

I am curious as to why you don't install 7pro in place of the RC?

Based on my understanding of this very conflicting and confusing issue of Upgrading, I believe you cannot upgrade on to the RC partition. I could be wrong, but that is my understanding. This is why I created another partition so I could choose that partition for the install once the process determined that I had a valid Vista installation. It would be much smoother if I could just dump the install on the RC partition but what would that do to my current multiboot if the bootloader is being controlled by the RC partition that I am going to wipe out?

Do I have it right?

Thanks

Joe P
 

joepwpb

Active Member
Hi joe,

Export the bcd store to one of the partitions you are keeping.

Install 7 in place of the RC.

Import the bcd store you saved. Easybcd will do it for you. You will need to Add the bcd entry for the 7 you just installed after importing the bcd store - not difficult.

Clean Install with a Upgrade Windows 7 Version - Windows 7 Forums

Thanks...

First, I do not see a Export/Import option in EasyBCD. Please elaborate.

Second, I will try your suggested method once we clarify the Export/Import procedure. Regarding the actual installation procedure, I believe I will be performing a "Custom" (clean) install either from a cold boot or from within Windows. Once the W7 install completes I assume that it will reboot back into W7 only since the current bootloader will be replaced. So, I will procede with installing EasyBCD Beta, import the BCD store then add back the XP and Vista partitions, correct? That sounds too easy!!

Please advise.

Joe P
 
Last edited:

Coolname007

Distinguished Member
Hello Joe.
Installing the Win 7 on top of the other one will not incur any ill effects, I don't believe. What will happen is the Win 7 installer will detect the other Windows OSes on your computer, and automatically add them to its BCD (I'm not sure, but the installer may not even replace the old BCD, if it detects one already there, and you don't format that partition first). If I were you, I would just go ahead, and do it.
But if you prefer to install it to its own empty partition, it is your choice. Either way, it should be fine.

Cheers.

Jake
 

joepwpb

Active Member
Hello Joe.
Installing the Win 7 on top of the other one will not incur any ill effects, I don't believe. What will happen is the Win 7 installer will detect the other Windows OSes on your computer, and automatically add them to its BCD (I'm not sure, but the installer may not even replace the old BCD, if it detects one already there, and you don't format that partition first). If I were you, I would just go ahead, and do it.
But if you prefer to install it to its own empty partition, it is your choice. Either way, it should be fine.

Cheers.

Jake

Thanks Jake...

The reason I started this thread was because everywhere I go there is a different answer and nobody is "for sure". The kinks are still being worked out. So, I wonder also what would happen to the bootloader on the 7RC partition if I were to choose it as the destination for the install. SIW2 is suggesting what appears to be a very safe method and I am awaiting his response regarding Exporting/Importing the BCD store.

I found in another forum the following, which seems to support your assertion:

"During setup, it will ask which partition you would like to install it onto. It will also automatically add itself to the multiboot menu. The Windows 7 disc is bootable, although it doesn't matter where you start the setup, as long as it can find 'proof of upgrade'- that is, a prior version of MS Windows that qualifies"

Joe P
 

SIW2

Distinguished Member
Hi joe,

Sorry , it is Manage Bootloader> Backup and Restore Backup.

The equivalent command are:

bcdedit /export path_and_filename_of_your_choice

and

bcdedit /import path_and_filename_of_your_choice
 
Last edited:

joepwpb

Active Member
Hi joe,

Sorry , it is Manage Bootloader> Backup and Restore Backup.

The equivalent command are:

bcdedit /export path_and_filename_of_your_choice

and

bcdedit /import path_and_filename_of_your_choice

Thanks for the clarification. I placed the bcd files on the Vista and XP partitions and a flash drive.

Now that I have all of the information from this thread and one other forum, I believe that I have several options available to me. Since I'm in no hurry to get W7 loaded and I do have backup images, I think I will do some experimenting, for my benefit and for those who visit this thread. My idea was to try each of the Upgrade processes discussed here and see first hand the complete process along with the results. I believe this can be done by not activating each of the installs. So, when all is said and done I should have two non-acitvated installations in a quadruple boot setup. I'm thinking that the first installation should be to the new empty partition, which is supposed to give me an automatic quadruple boot without any tweaks. Then the second install will be to the RC partition which should retain the existing quadruple boot. Upon completion I should have two W7 installs followed by Vista then XP and I can decide which one of the W7 installs to activate.

This may sound like a crazy idea but I think it is worth trying.

Comment?

Thanks

Joe P
 

joepwpb

Active Member
First of Two "Experiments" Completed

As I stated in my last post I planned to try two different installations of W7 Pro Upgrade to see first hand the results with my triple boot setup of Win 7 (RC), Vista Home Premuim and XP Pro. I proceeded to perform a "Custom" (clean) install to a newly created partition and as expected, there were no issues in the procedure. The only variable was that I chose not to Activate. At the last reboot of the Setup process, I was expecting a quadruple boot menu but I was met with a quintuple boot menu as follows:

There are a total of 5 entries listed in the bootloader.

Default: Windows 7
Timeout: 30 seconds.
Boot Drive: E:\

Entry #1
Name: Earlier Version of Windows
BCD ID: {ntldr}
Drive: E:\
Bootloader Path: \ntldr

Entry #2
Name: Windows 7
BCD ID: {default}
Drive: N:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.exe

Entry #3
Name: Windows 7
BCD ID: {28c09d38-bc54-11de-ac87-0021850eb145}
Drive: M:\
Bootloader Path: \windows\system32\winload.exe

Entry #4
Name: Windows Vista
BCD ID: {current}
Drive: C:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.exe

Entry #5
Name: Microsoft XP PRO
BCD ID: {98bb9bcf-8456-11dd-b036-001060e85d3a}
Drive: E:\
Bootloader Path: \NTLDR

Prior to the installaion of 7 Pro the BCD file looked like this:

There are a total of 3 entries listed in the bootloader.

Default: Windows 7
Timeout: 30 seconds.
Boot Drive: E:\

Entry #1
Name: Windows 7
BCD ID: {default}
Drive: M:\
Bootloader Path: \windows\system32\winload.exe

Entry #2
Name: Windows Vista
BCD ID: {current}
Drive: C:\
Bootloader Path: \Windows\system32\winload.exe

Entry #3
Name: Microsoft XP PRO
BCD ID: {98bb9bcf-8456-11dd-b036-001060e85d3a}
Drive: E:\
Bootloader Path: \NTLDR

Can anyone explain how I ended with a 5 OS boot menu? Also, it looks like I have to make some adjustments in easy BCD and would appreciated suggestions.

Thanks

Joe P
 

Coolname007

Distinguished Member
Just delete the "Earlier Version of Windows" entry, and you'll be fine.
It was added because the installer detected XP on your computer, but apparently wasn't smart enough to realize there was already an entry for it in the BCD. :wink:
 

joepwpb

Active Member
Just delete the "Earlier Version of Windows" entry, and you'll be fine.
It was added because the installer detected XP on your computer, but apparently wasn't smart enough to realize there was already an entry for it in the BCD. :wink:

Thanks...

As I stated, I was expecting a quadruple boot so I was quite surprised to see 5 entries.

For the sake of knowledge, do you think this was a fluke or it is something that will happen to every triple boot setup?

Thanks again,

Joe P
 

Coolname007

Distinguished Member
I think it will happen anytime you install Vista or W7 on a computer which has XP installed, but that's only a guess (I'm going from other people's experience, not my own, because I have never installed Vista before, just XP and W7). It is interesting to note though that when I installed W7 on my own system, on a computer which already had a Vista/XP/Ubuntu multiboot setup, it did not add such an entry to the BCD for XP. It only added itself to my Vista BCD. But then again, I installed mine to a VHD (virtual hard disk), so that could have something to do with it too...

Jake
 

joepwpb

Active Member
I think it will happen anytime you install Vista or W7 on a computer which has XP installed, but that's only a guess ...
Jake

Thanks Jake...

I was fairly confident that it would create a quadruple boot because of something I believe I read on this forum. Considering all I read through in the past 10 days I could be wrong. Maybe the moderator would know...

Joe P
 

Coolname007

Distinguished Member
Thanks Jake...

I was fairly confident that it would create a quadruple boot because of something I believe I read on this forum. Considering all I read through in the past 10 days I could be wrong. Maybe the moderator would know...

Joe P
To be a bit picky, it did create a quadruple boot, but just added an extra XP entry. :wink:
I assume your system is working now the way you want it to?

Cheers.

Jake
 

joepwpb

Active Member
To be a bit picky, it did create a quadruple boot, but just added an extra XP entry. :wink:
I assume your system is working now the way you want it to?

Cheers.

Jake

Yes, it is working as I want it to...a quadruple boot

Hopefully, I did not seem to be "picky" because that was not my intention. I just wanted to confirm, if possible, the end results I got of a quintuple boot as being "normal" or a fluke. It would be helpful to all who visit this forum, and possibly this thread, to know what to expect in the same situation.


Thanks

Joe P
 

RobertWy

Member
Also, My Computer will not show any partitions which do not have any drive letters assigned to them. And so consequently, the partitions only show up in Disk Management. Did they have drive letters before?

I had that problem when I tried to add another drive to an XP Pro box and make it a dual-boot XP/XP. The problem was caused by losing a multi-card reader connected to a USB port, which showed up as 4 separate drive letters in XP. But I had also been adding and removing 2 other HDD's, which also got drive letters.

The fix was to just remove the unused drive letters in CurrentControlSet MountedDevices drive letters.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/223188

I just deleted the drive letters that weren't being used and rebooted.
 
Top