Need Help with Dual Boot in Easy BCD

#21
Note: Those files will only be in the XP partition if it is the "active" partition (as seen from Disk Management) of that HDD (I don't how many partitions you have on that HDD, so I thought I'd just make that point clear). Otherwise, they will be in whatever partition the active one is.
 
#22
Those files were in the XP partition, and we are making progress, but I got a new error message when I select XP from the boot menu.

Paraphrazing: Windows can't start. Needs the file: <windows root>\system32\ntoskrnl.exe

Where do I get that file and where do I put it?
 
#23
That message usually means the boot.ini file is mis-configured.
Did you follow the rest of my instructions, and make sure to change the rdisk(0) values of both lines in your boot.ini to rdisk(1)s instead?
 
#24
SUCCESS! I was so focused on finding the boot.ini file I forgot I had to edit once I did. I am posting this from my (successfully booted) XP drive.

Many thanks, mate. Enjoy the rest of your weekend.
 
#25
Happy to hear it. :smile:
Now to figure out why EasyBCD didn't autoconfigure when it was supposed to...

Which version of EasyBCD were you using?
 
#27
Ahh...that explains it then.
Terry linked to the [thread=642]2.0 Beta[/thread] versions (which have the auto-configure feature, while 1.7.2. doesn't), but I guess you missed that.

Oh well...

For future reference, use the beta next time, and it'll do all the hard stuff (such as putting the boot files in the right place, configuring boot.ini, etc.) for you itself, automatically, and you wont have to do hardly a thing. (But, I suppose, what's the fun in that? :smile: )
 
#28
I saw the beta link in his post but figured the version I have would do the trick. I'll replace the one I have with the beta--in case I need it in teh future.

Thanks again
 
#29
Hi all,

Nice forum (yes another noob!) In my case I get no Bootloader at all despite having Win 7 on one drive and Vista on another. After reading this interesting thread, I booted to my Win 7 64 drive, installed EasyBCD 1.7.2, added my Vista 64 drive (pointing it to drive F: in this case), saved and rebooted. But still no Bootloader.

An anomoly in my AMI BIOS Boot section could shed light. I see both drives (OS) in the 'Hard Drives' section and can choose either one as No 1 or No 2. But then, when I go to Boot Priority I can only select the drive I chose as No. 1 drive to be the first drive to boot from. The other drive isn't even listed so I can't select it as No. 2. Same whichever drive I choose of the two.

So my system just won't dual boot via the Bootloader at the moment. I suspect its the boot file but don't feel comfortable going there, hence this post. I can live with the BIOS method but would much prefer the Bootloader, for obvious reasons. Any ideas or a solution wd be welcomed.

With thanks,
Gareth
Costa Blanca, SPAIN
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#30
Hi Gareth, welcome to NST

Please read the thread more carefully !
Razor took 2 days to fix something that would have taken 2 minutes if he'd read the reply and taken any notice of it.
Don't use 1.7.2 - It's too old to contain support for cutting edge OSs.
Get the latest build of EasyBCD 2.0
Install it on W7, set W7 HDD to boot 1st in BIOS
Add/Remove entries - Windows Tab - Type Vista/7 - Drive (whatever letter W7 sees the Vista partition as) - "Add Entry"
In "Change Settings" check that timeout is not 0 (zero suppresses the boot menu)
 
#31
Thanks Terry, that of course solved it.

FWIW when I first discovered this site last week I linked to the ver 2.0 download page after carefully reading the Razor mail but at that stage wasn't registered, was under pressures, and bailed out. A few days later, pressures out of the way, I decided to revisit the problem, your site, Register and then having carefully forgotten everything I'd seen ..... well you know the rest.

Nice pic. Ever flown anything exotic?

Cheers

Gareth
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#32
Glad you're all fixed up.
Most fun was a Pitts S2a.
Biggest regret - within a hairsbreadth of flying with Nick Grace when he died in a car crash.
His widow, Caroline, not a flier at that time, took a couple of years to become the new operator, during which time, I'd retired and lost the contacts (and the cash) to fulfill my lifelong ambition.
He was based at Goodwood (my flying club), but subsequently, both I and the Spitfire moved to new homes, far apart.

(make sure your soundcard is set to Max Vol - full stereo, before clicking embedded link)
 
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#33
Zounds!! I did just as you suggested and ran the link at pretty much full bore! The sound of that Spit brought my wife rushing in (and I have to admit a tear to my throat and a lump to my eye.) Sad business and I feel for you that you missed out one of the most unforgettable experiences ...

As for me, retired too and put out to pasture in sunny Spain these past 6 years. What wouldn't I give to try a real aerobatic little beast like the Pitts... The Chipmunk on the other hand, while being somewhat gutless was a thoroughbred in its own way and coupled with the RAF training (Southampton Uni Air Squadron 1962-63) meant we learned outrageous confidence in small flying machines totally out of keeping with our 19-21 years of life. Never signed up or took up an aviation career but flew lots of small stuff over 26 years spent in New Zealand until 1996.

These days I have to be content with such things as flying the outstanding Aerosoft Piper Cheyenne (FSX) over your old stamping grounds to Shoreham in the UK VFR Scenery or flying DME approaches in to Compton-Abbas in IMC - stopping of course for a drink at COM before winging home to Bourenmouth, OUR old stamping grounds.

Terry, its nice when sites like yours can help get us up an running to enjoy the fun side of computing and forgetting the O's and 1' for awhile.

All the best
Gareth
Somewhere between LELC and LEAL
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#34
I'd like to have flown a Chipmunk. My dad worked for Airspeed (later to become part of DH) from before (and all-through) WW2, and to its demise when HS acquired and closed it, so I have a fondness for all the DH stable.
My nearest experience of one, was being eyeball to eyeball, head on with one flown by a cadet.
I was stationary at the holding point of Goodwood 33, as he was attempting a slightly crosswind landing. He got a bit over enthusiastic with the rudder and came past me sideways.
I was convinced I was about to be the nearest eye-witness to an air accident, when he managed to sort his left from his right and got it straight down the centre-line in the nick of time, and actually made a perfect landing. (though I suspect a change of underwear might have been in order back in the clubhouse)
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#35
That sounds incredible... makes me wish I took up flying or something as a hobby; then I remembered I don't have the time it takes to commit to something like this....

How much time does it take?
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#36
When I learned CG, It was 40 hours needed for a PPL.
When I started flying it cost £8/hour, when I stopped £80/hour, a similar time has elapsed since those 2 events so what the cost is now I don't know (£800/hour ?)
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#37
40 hours? wow.... it only takes 30 to get drive a car, so I was expecting something more like 200 !

I figured the price would be sky-high these days..
 
#38
When I learned CG, It was 40 hours needed for a PPL.
When I started flying it cost £8/hour, when I stopped £80/hour, a similar time has elapsed since those 2 events so what the cost is now I don't know (£800/hour ?)
Wow! Yeah, the price has definitely jumped up. :smile:
I'm thinking about maybe learning how to fly myself someday...I'm still pretty young, and in good shape. :wink: Flying is probably pretty cool. Can't wait to try it.
 

Terry60

Knows where his towel is.
Staff member
#39
40 hours was the statutory minimum, within which multiple goals had to be achieved and flying and ground exams passed. It might take more than the minimum before all of the necessary requirements had been met, depending on the aptitude of the pupil and the intensity of the course. (If you learn in widely spread lessons, the instructor generally checks that you've not forgotten past skills, so there's a lot of repetition which might increase the overall total time taken)
 
#40
Yeah, that makes sense.
Of course, I'm sure by now, the minimum is probably much higher...

How many years ago was that, anyway, when you got your flying license?