NeoSmart Book Club

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#1
Last edited:

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#2
An auction-house in Britain has just sold a 1937 "First Edition" of JRR Tolkien's "The Hobbit" for £60,000 - or approximately 121,256.63 USD (and rising!).

BBC NEWS | UK | England | Tolkien's Hobbit fetches £60,000

IMHO that's just crazy though... whatever sentimental value "The Hobbit" might have to that anonymous buyer... it certainly can't really be worth that much green! Imagine how many second-edition copies of the book he could have bought for that much! :grinning:
 

Attachments

#3
sadly the hobbit was the only JRR Tolkien book i read but i must say i was addicted to it i read it all in a night or two
(it was supposed to be our semester book)
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#4
Why sadly? This means you still have an opportunity to enjoy Lord of the Rings for the very first time! :grinning:
 

Mak 2.0

Mod...WAFFLES!?!?
Staff member
#5
I still have my copies of the JRR books from when i was a kid. The book i am currently reading is The Physics of Immortality.



A very interesting read suggested to me by a good friend. The book proves the existence of God thru Physics. If and when i finish it i will write up a book report. Which i have not done in over 15 years...
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#6
:lol: it must be a really good book then.

I'm currently reading Duma Key by Stephen King.... just started; it seems to be a good book, but nothing extraordinary so far.
 

Mak 2.0

Mod...WAFFLES!?!?
Staff member
#7
Is there a god?
Most modern scientists would answer that with a simple no. They would say that there is no proog, no indication, no hint in nature that the universe is anything but a cold, unknowing place, that human beings are accidents of evolution, there when er sie, our consciorsness disappears into oblivion.

But what if there was proof?
That is off the back of the book. So far it is a interesting book. Now i never took Physics. So i really dont know much about that subject. But this book dumbs it down enough and gives you enough math info to figure out what he is saying. Then in the back of the book he goes into great detail with his theories and formulas to prove what he says.

Of course i am no where near the end or to understanding the math at the end. But i must say very interesting using math and science to prove something ilke this.
 
#8
I'm reading eldest (inheritance series) its really nice I'm waiting for the third brizinger to come out it was on one of the must read booklists
 
#9
I Was thinking about reading The Pillars of the Earth.
It was on Oprah's book club top thing and i think its on the top of the Bew York Bestsellers List. Its by Ken Follet. Did anyone read it? If so do you recommend it.

As for at this moment im reading the Complete Sherlock Holmes (E-Book). I never actually finished it all in order. Even though i have read most Sherlock Holmes stories through different books.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#10
Ken Follet's "Pillars of Earth" looks like a good read - it's from 1989 though, and the reason its popular right now is because he just finished the sequel: "World without End" (which is also on the best sellers list)
 

Sarge

Active Member
#12
I didn't read a lot of books, but I loved Literary Theory because I write sometimes and I'm reading something about poetry on a theory's level. I love it. :smile:
 

Ex_Brit

If you're going through hell, keep going.
Staff member
#14
Sarge, I just noticed the bottom part of your signature...ROTFL.

Books have been a huge part of my life and I have kept them all. My apartment has shelves and shelves of them, that is apart from every single issue of National Geographic Magazine since January 1954 all neatly boxed by year.

I have so many favourite books that I couldn't begin to say what my favourite is. I could mention a few that moulded my childhood such as Alice in Wonderland which cemented my belief in the impossible at a very early age plus Charles Dickens (Christmas Carol et alia), Robert Louis Stevenson (Treasure Island etc.). Or, Arthur Ransome's Swallows & Amazons series of books. All great reading for kids. Those got me interested in Geography, ergo travel.
For years I have been a great sci-fi fan and love Frank Herbet (Dune), Isaac Asimov (Caves of Steel) and Arthur C. Clarke (Songs of Distant Earth, Imperial Earth, 2001, 2010, 2061, 3001 - he just died).
Lately my reading has tapered off a bit....too busy typing on this darned keyboard I guess. But the most absorbing book I read recently would easily be voted in...The Da Vinci Code. Good movie too.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#15
Same here, Peter (with regards to the typing taking precedence over the reading). I read The Da Vinci Code when it came out, but I was very disappointed; it didn't live up to the hype at all!

I felt that it was getting all that attention for its controversial views on religion and whatnot, but the author isn't anywhere near as talented as he's made out to be; in fact, his other works (particularly Angles & Demons and Digital Fortress) are much better-written than TDC.....

The most-compelling read in recent years for me would have to be the conclusion of the Harry Potter series. JK Rowling is such a talented author; esp. with all the pressure and expectations from the final book in the HP series - it mustn't have been easy to write that... the earlier books held me spell-bound, I admit to obsessing over them until the last one came out, and the "spell" was broken (absolutely no pun intended).

Arthur Clarke is no doubt brilliant, but my favorite sci-fi author is Orson Scott Card. Ender's Game has to be the best sci-fi series, in my humble opinion, of course....
 

Ex_Brit

If you're going through hell, keep going.
Staff member
#16
I never read any of the Harry Potter books but loved the movies. I failed to mention JRR Tolkien, - read all his books and loved the movies too.
I must try that author you mentioned.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#17
I doubt I need to say it, but anyway: if you loved the movies, you'll be astounded by the books.

I loved the books so much that I hated all the movies - they were such a good series that not only did the movies not do the books justice, but they were also a pain to watch.
 

Ex_Brit

If you're going through hell, keep going.
Staff member
#18
Now you've got me feeling guilty. I shall no doubt start reading JK Rowling.
 
#19
Another great series in my opinion is the Lincoln Rhyme series by Jeffery Deaver. For those that dont know it its about a crippled ex-NYPD detective that solves mysteries. One book was adapted into a movie with Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie (The Bone Collector)
And yes Peter you are missing alot in the HP series. Maybe if you start reading now you may finish in a month or more or less sepending on how fast/much you read. Most of the books take one day deticated reading each.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
#20
Seeing as the first book is around 200 pages long, and the 5th is around 800... I don't think they take the same amount of time to finish! :wink: