Two OS win7 and XP on two disks - no dual boot

wabe

Member
Here is the output from power console:

BootGrabber utility.
Copyright NeoSmart Technologies 2009-2010 <http://neosmart.net/>
D0,2,2,0,750156374016
P1,I:\,7,104857600,73699328,Yes,multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)
P2,C:\,7,750048509952,639669891072,Yes,multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(2)
D1,3,3,0,500107862016
P1,D:\,7,104855837184,69559865344,Yes,multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)
P2,E:\,7,104855869440,79098621952,Yes,multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(2)
P3,F:\,7,290393510400,106105524224,Yes,multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(3)

"D0" is new disk with Win 7. First partition is hidden 100 mb system partition with boot folder. Second partition is useable partition for win 7.

"D1" is former first disk (before installing new disk and win 7). Win XP is in first partition of this disk. Posted boot.ini is copied from root of this partition.

As far as I can see all look OK in this list but for some reason EasyBCD cannot find the system files (boot.ini, NTLDR,NTDETECT) at multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)
 

Terry60

Telephone Sanitizer (2nd Class)
Staff member
EasyBCD doesn't look for those files on XP, It creates copies in the "active system" partition. That's where it will look for "edit legacy entries"
The mystery is why, if you asked it to auto-configure, it failed to do so, but gave you no error or failure messages.
What happens if you use Tools/auto-configure instead of triggering it through the add ?
 

wabe

Member
Got a bit desperate and carried out a manual procedure since I've now got a much better understanding of how the boot process works.
- Copied the three system files from backup (boot.ini edited to correct relative disk) to boot folder of system partition. Got a missing /NTLDR message
- Also copied these files to root of system partition. Now fully functional.

Got the impression that the parameter "boot" in EasyBCD referred to the boot folder but it seems the legacy system files should be in root.

For the benefit of bug tracking I'm willing to remove these files and see if the "tool procedure" mentioned by Terry above might work.
 

Terry60

Telephone Sanitizer (2nd Class)
Staff member
CG uses "boot" in the vernacular English language sense of "the boot partition - the one you boot from", the same way that the Linux community uses it.
Unfortunately MS uniquely uses the word "system" to indicate where the boot files are, and "boot" to indicate where the Operating System is (go figure !)
That "boot" in the BCD entry indicates that the XP boot files are in the root of the "system" partition.
As you discovered, the boot folder is another thing entirely. It's the container of the Vista/7 BCD and its accoutrements and is also in the "system" root.
 
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