Ubuntu 7.10 Final

Sarge

Active Member
Try letting the live cd run until you hear the Ubuntu welcome screen sound from your speakers, then ctrl+alt+backspace, this will reload x-server and hopefully give you a screen you can see. This worked for me.

Mike

So THAT'S what happens if you press ctrl+alt+backspace :grinning: Guru, just tell me does it tells you anything ?? :?? Hahaha, I just have to remind you if you don't remember :grinning: It was great... it was in Linux Ubuntu, yeah :grinning: *ROFL*
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
No, I know about ctrl+alt+bkspc... which restarts xserver.

Sarge, it was some other key combination (I think it was one of the F-keys with another key) that would kill xserver and not bring it back.
 

Sarge

Active Member
Ha! You remember. :joy:

Yeah, I know it was something else (I thought it was something like that, but I was wrong), but very interesting, you have to say :smile:
 

Sarge

Active Member
Oh no, my Ubuntu 7.10 says that it has an error in one file, installation stopped about on the half :frowning: how, did my cd writer wrote it wrong, or error was in the mirror I downloaded from? Damn... I want my Ubuntu now! :angry:
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
Do an MD5 or PGP check. If it passes, then it's a problem with burning.
 

Mak 2.0

Mod...WAFFLES!?!?
Staff member
Interesting article i just found...

Ubuntu bug causes unnecessary wear and tear on a hard drive, however there is a simple fix

A recent bug report for Ubuntu Linux has confirmed that both the Feisty and Gutsy versions of Ubuntu cause some unnecessary wear and tear on a hard drive. The bug report reads:

“I run feisty (beta) on a Dell Inspiron 9400 with a Hitachi HTS541616J9SA00 hard drive. After booting, the drive's power management settings are such that it spins down A LOT. To give you some statistics: the drive is rated for 600,000 load/unload cycles, and after 2.5 months of running Feisty I'm already at more than 56,000 load/unload cycles (and only 150 power cycles), according to the SMART data. At this rate the drive will be dead after 2.5 years, and I don't even use this computer for more than a couple of hours each day.”

Definitely an interesting sounding find. But what exactly does it mean? That's what I thought when I read it, so I did a little research. Feel free to comment and correct me if I've gotten anything wrong.

Load/Unload refers to a device that controls the position of the sliders on a hard drive. If you think about a hard drive as an old fashioned record player, the platters of the hard drive would be the record, while the sliders on the hard drive would be the needle. The only difference here is that the sliders never actually make contact with the platters. Instead, an air current provided by the platters rotating keeps the slider and the platter apart by a precise distance known as the flying height. Significant damage to the disk could occur if the slider was in contact with the platter during a sudden jarring moment (like dropping your laptop). To provide a bit of safety in mobile applications (and in some cases desktop as well) load/unload technology was introduced. Essentially, there is a small device that moves the slider off the platter. When data needs to be accessed, the sliders position themselves back over the platters and make contact with them only once they’ve reached the proper rotational speed.

To apply what we’ve just learned, the drive reported has a life span of 600,000 load/unload cycles before the precisely machined tolerances in the drive begin to deteriorate. Somewhere along the line, the drives are being asked to spin down very frequently. These are factors controlled by a power management utility within the drive called Advanced Power Management, or apm, and are dictated by Ubuntu after boot-up. The problem is simply that the drives are spinning up and down too often, and the sliders are being forced to roll on and off the ramp where they’re stored when in off use, causing wear and tear on the slider assembly (not to mention the motor spinning the drive).

The solution, as the original poster pointed out, is relatively simple:

“The fix? I have to do:

hdparm -B 255 /dev/sda

and the spinning-down stops. I don't know what certain other OSes do with their drives at bootup, but the current behaviour is certainly deadly for the drive. Worse: nobody will notice, since smartmontools aren't installed by default. I noticed frequent clicking sounds earlier, but I didn't think those were spindowns since I hadn't specifically set the drive into any low-power mode. I only noticed this by accident after I got smartmontools working.”

What does that command do? Let’s break it down.

hdparm: This is a linux command designed to fetch and set certain attributes of ATA/IDE hard drives.

The -B: Set Advanced Power Management feature, if the drive supports it. A low value means aggressive power management and a high value means better performance. A value of 255 will disable apm on the drive.

and /dev/sda is obviously the disk drive in question.

A relatively simple fix for a somewhat complicated problem. The only issue here is that battery life will be adversely affected, however that’s better than having a hard drive that’s dead two years after you bought it. It will be interesting to see how the Ubuntu team decides to handle this. As of yet, the trouble ticket is unassigned.

Explanation of Ubuntu Hard Drive Wear and Tear | Linux-Hero.com
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
That certainly is interesting... My XP SP3 install just went south (all web browsers are freezing for seconds at a time) and now I'm on Ubuntu only.

Thanks for sharing this, Mak. I had actually already done that (unwittingly) thanks to this guide on boosting system performance with the hdparm tool: HOWTO Use hdparm to improve IDE device performance - Gentoo Linux Wiki

Anyway, certainly worth the read!

(That sentence about what other operating systems may be doing.... that has got me wondering!!)

Addendum:

Here's the official bug page: Bug #59695 in acpi-support (Ubuntu): “default value in power.sh potentially kills laptop disks”

Sucks - the devs don't seem to have realized how important this is :frowning:
 
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Sarge

Active Member

Mak 2.0

Mod...WAFFLES!?!?
Staff member
Glad to share important info Guru. :grinning:
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member

Sarge

Active Member
Oh great, thank you so much! *runs to check* :smile:
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
Here are the MD5 hashes (taken from here)

 

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Sarge

Active Member
Ok, are all settings right? And now I click generate, right? and when loading is done, it doesn't say anything, is that how it should be?
 

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mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
After you press generate a status bar should appear and start to calculate the values - it'll take several minutes to finish since it's a big file.

Then in front of the "MD5" bit you should see the MD5 of this file.
 

Sarge

Active Member
This is after generation, so, is it broken or not? :smile:
 

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Sarge

Active Member
Um... no, it wont work, because of my ISP's proxies, firewalls, and ports... I test with the port that was there, and it says error, I put my port, and it says error again, I see it shows me different IP :S Dunno... I think I'm gonna have to download again.
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member

Sarge

Active Member
Yes, I'm using FDM since 1.0, I LOVE IT :grinning: Its the best one, in my opinion.

My Ubuntu is dead at the moment :smile: I'll install 7.10 very soon and inject it with tons of software. :grinning:

Just one question: Does 7.10 have those 3D effects installed or I need to do it? :lup:
 

mqudsi

Mostly Harmless
Staff member
already installed!!

(You have ATi right? That's good news, because ATi just released their newest open source drivers that improve performance like crazy!)
 
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